Ed Driscoll

Jimmy "I'll Never Lie To You" Carter, Lies

Last year, Bruce Walker wrote at the American Thinker:

“I’ll never lie to you,” Carter famously told American voters in 1976.  His smile was all embracing.  Carter seldom got angry.  He talked about his evangelical Christian faith often.  Carter promised change and hope.  He told us that the mean and cynical government that we had come to expect from Washington was a thing of the past.

Millions of Americans, many of them who had remained uninvolved in American politics, listened.  They trusted Carter to be “different.”  His carefully crafted words led people to believe that Jimmy Carter was something very different from the typical sort of Democrat.  Carter would try something new.  He was an idealist who was not wedded to failed ideals of the past.

Then Carter won.

And we all know what happened after that. (Click over to Walker’s column for a quick tour of the Bad Old Days if by chance you need a refresher.)

Carter gets caught on CNN attempting some major dissembling of his racialist remarks of a couple of weeks ago:

CNN’s Candy Crowley tried to prompt former President Jimmy Carter to explain his charge of racism against opponents of President Obama on Thursday’s American Morning, but the Democrat tried to worm his way out of what he said. Crowley paraphrased, “You said, overall, you thought the protesters were upset that there was a black president,” to which Carter replied, “That’s not what I said” .

The topic of the former president’s inflammatory accusation came midway through the CNN correspondent’s live interview during the 8 am Eastern hour. Crowley had first asked Carter about the revamp of his presidential museum and library. Before turning to the Obama/race issue, she also prompted Mrs. Carter, who was also present, to comment on the future of mental health care.

YCR20090912Carter was clearly defensive about his allegation when Crowley brought it up. The correspondent put her question this way: “Mr. President, let me ask you first- domestically, you made some remarks recently about how you felt about the protesters that were protesting against President Obama. You said, overall, you thought the protesters were upset that there was a black president, that there was racism involved.” The former president interrupted, “By the way, that’s not what I said.”

The Democrat continued that “I said, those on the fringe element that had vituperative personal attacks on President Obama- those were the ones that I included.” Crowley attempted to read her paraphrase again, but Carter shot back, “No, it wasn’t. If you read the remarks carefully, you’ll see that’s not what I said. I said those that had a personal vituperative attack [sic] on- on President Obama as a person- that was tinged with racism, but I recognize that people who disagree with him on health care or the environment, things like that- the vast majority of those are not tinged by racism.”

As Allahpundit adds at Hot Air:

Via Breitbart. Evidently the entire country, including the White House, misunderstood what he meant by “intensely demonstrated” when he said, “I think an overwhelming portion of the intensely demonstrated animosity toward President Barack Obama is based on the fact that he is a black man, that he’s African-American.” That’s the money quote from the interview that aired on NBC on September 15 — just six days after Joe Wilson’s outburst and three days after the 9/12 Project’s massive rally in D.C. Compare and contrast the before and after below. I wonder which Obama aide was tasked with dialing him up and insisting upon this highly nuanced bit of revisionism. Rahm, you think? Or is this an Axelrod special?

Allah has video of Carter’s remarks then and now.

Incidentally, Walker’s column on Carter is also worth revisiting because it accurately predicts that if Senator Obama became president, he’d likely be the second coming of Carter — and Obama has done nothing to disprove those forecasts.

Unless you believe he’s more the second coming of Nixon, of course.