Ed Driscoll

When In Doubt, Blame Bill Gates

In the 1970s, Hollywood didn’t seem to know where its audience went, as ticket-sales increasingly flat-lined until two young tyro directors named Spielberg and Lucas had a blinding flash of the obvious: American moviegoers want to be entertained, not beaten over the head with obviously political agitprop.

In the 1990s, Hollywood longed for a strong 50-something president who would kick terrorist butt and could even fly a plane when needed. Having witnessed such a man actually get elected, they very quickly went insane and in their seven year temper tantrum, slowly forgot the key to success given to them by the two young directors in the late 1970s.

Since Hollwyood’s lacks the collective humility to look within themselves when the bucks don’t gush as fast as they’d like Hollywood’s film makers actually lapsed into quite a novel series of excuses in the post 9/11-“naughts”:

  • In 2003 it was cell phones.
  • In 2005 it was the Red States.
  • In 2006, the Hindenburg-like crash of Basic Instinct 2 on its opening weekend was blamed by Hollywood insiders on the nation being “in a big puritanical mode“–which would be news to the millions who subscribe to Playboy, Penthouse, Maxim, et al.
  • Near the start of this year, the movie industry was floundering due to supermarket tabloids.
  • And the newest excuse? Halo 3.

    No, really!

    Many film executives are convinced audiences stayed home to play Microsoft