Dr. Helen

Do Three Liberals Make a Trend?

I wondered about this as I read a post over at Alpha Game Blog on liberals ousting friends and families from their lives for voting for Trump:

It is reported that Hillary Clinton voters are cutting supporters of the God-Emperor Ascendant out of their lives:

Many Hillary Clinton voters have ceased communicating with friends, and even family members, who voted for Donald Trump. It is so common that the New York Times published a front-page article on the subject headlined “Political Divide Splits Relationships — and Thanksgiving, Too.”

The article begins with three stories: Matthew Horn, a software engineer from Boulder, Colo., canceled Christmas plans with his family in Texas. Nancy Sundin, a social worker in Spokane, Wash., has called off Thanksgiving with her mother and brother. Ruth Dorancy, a software designer in Chicago, decided to move her wedding so that her fiancé’s grandmother and aunt, strong Trump supporters from Florida, could not attend.

The Times acknowledges that this phenomenon is one-sided, saying, “Democrats have dug in their heels, and in some cases are refusing to sit across the table from relatives who voted for President-elect Donald J. Trump.” A number of people who voted for Trump called my show to tell me that their daughters had informed them they would no longer allow their parents to see their grandchildren. And one man sent me an e-mail reporting that his brother-in-law’s mother told him that she “no longer had a son.”

Vox Day astutely points out:

That being said, this is one of those “three people are a trend” stories that the Carlos Slim blog likes to run, so chances are it will, like most of those trends, have absolutely no relevance to your life.

I find it rather telling that places like the Times and their readers always demand “facts” from conservatives for anything they say about trends or data but demand so little from themselves. If a few New York liberals feel or do something, does that make it a “fact”? Maybe facts should be be re-defined as when three liberals have a consensus.