Culture

First Responders Report Hearing 'Voices' in Rescue of Toddler

You’ve probably already heard of the inspiring story of 18-month-old Lily Groesbeck, who was in a car driven by her mother that veered off the road and ended up overturned and in a creek. It was 14 hours before rescuers reached the partially submerged car.

The mother, 25-year-old Lynn Groesbeck, died soon after the crash. But baby Lily hung on grimly. She is now recovering in a local hospital, as her tale of survival has swept the world.

But there’s another aspect to this story that hasn’t received a lot of press. Four of the first responders to the accident swear that they heard cries for help from a woman in the car as they were working frantically to turn the car over and rescue the occupant.

Fox News:

Ainsley Earhardt reported on “Fox and Friends” that as rescuers rushed down to the car, four police officers all say they heard the same thing: a woman calling out, begging for help.

But they can’t explain who that voice was, because the baby’s mother, 25-year-old Lynn Groesbeck, was killed in the crash hours before, and the voice they heard was too mature to be the toddler.

“When we all talked together, I said, ‘Was I the only one that was hearing this?’ thinking that I was hearing things,” Tyler Beddoes, one of the officers who rescued the toddler, explained. “And when I talked to the other officers, we all had heard the same thing, a voice saying, ‘Help us. Help me.'”

Another officer described the same thing to Deseret News.

“We’ve gotten together and just talk about it and all four of us can swear that we heard somebody inside the car saying, ‘Help,’” said Officer Jared Warner.

The officers say that the calls for help pushed them to work even harder to flip the car over.

When they righted the partially submerged vehicle, they were shocked to find the mother dead and the toddler alive

“We were just able to push the car onto its side. How, I don’t know, whether it’s adrenaline or what. But it was incredible,” officer Bryan Dewitt said. “As I grabbed the little baby out of the car seat, as I pulled her head up, I could tell that there was some life in her. I could see her eyes open.”

It’s easy for most of us to scoff at the officer’s story — except among first responders to accidents and other life and death situations, this is hardly unusual:

Both Meehan and Rudnicki regularly come into contact with people moments away from death or scenes where traumatic accidents have occurred as part of their regular full-time jobs. Meehan said, although they keep it separate, the duo started doing paranormal investigations as an extension of what they do through their fire departments: help people.

“When a person is killed before their time or in a violent manner you can sometimes come in contact with that energy,” Rudnicki said.

“You’re that beacon at night in the fog,” Meehan added.

There are many anecdotal stories of two or more first responders having a paranormal experience at an accident site. A mysterious stranger who talks with them and appears to know details of the accident, or strange lights and voices at the scene. Doctors and nurses also report unexplained phenomena at the time of death.

There are no easy answers based on science. About all you can say is:

For those who believe, no proof is necessary. For those who don’t believe, no proof is possible.