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World Gone Wild

March 20th, 2013 - 11:51 am

Don’t read Spengler when you’re grouchy. Or maybe that’s the best time. Anyway, here he is on Russia’s perception of the U.S. these last ten years or so:

Could the Americans really have been such idiots?, the Russians ask. Of course we could. George Bush and his advisers actually believed that we were going to bring democracy to Iraq and the rest of the Middle East. The Russians understood matters differently. Fyodor Lukyanov writes:

In the summer 2006, when then-President George W. Bush came to St. Petersburg for a summit of the “Big Eight,” an interesting dialogue took place between him and Russian President Vladimir Putin at a news conference. Bush drew attention to the challenges posed by democratic freedoms, especially freedom of the press, in Russia — and then noted that things had gotten much better in Iraq. Putin immediately responded, “Well, we really would not want the kind of democracy they have in Iraq.” The room filled with applause, and not everyone heard Bush’s response: “Just wait, it’s coming.” What Bush had in mind was increased stability in Iraq, but it sounded more ominous: you’ll see, democracy will be brought to you as well…

If the Russians sound mad, consider this: there is another substantial body of opinion that sees an evil conspiracy behind American blundering in the Middle East, and it votes for Ron Paul and Rand Paul. I am not suggesting that Sen. Rand Paul is a paranoid, I hasten to clarify: I have never met the man and don’t presume to judge his state of mind. But his popularity stems in no small measure from conspiracy theorists who think that the U.S. government really is planning to criss-cross the continental United States with killer drones and pick off American citizens on their home soil. A lot of the same people think that America invaded Iraq on behalf of the oil companies (who would make a lot more money if Iraq were zapped by space aliens) or by the Israelis (who never liked the project from the outset). A fair sampling of such paranoia gets posted on the comments section of this site.

Thus we have the strangest pair of bedfellows in modern politics, the Russians and the rubes.

A dozen or more years ago I read James Dale Davidson and William Rees-Mogg’s The Sovereign Individual: Mastering the Transition to the Information Age. It’s a fascinating read, and just as relevant today as it was when it was written in the late ’90s. There are two points in it of particular salience today.

The first is their argument that the reduced cost of offensive weaponry had changed both the parameters of warfare, and its participants. At the time, this part had me shaking my head at how wrong two smart gentlemen could be. Tanks and planes cost more than ever. It takes months and millions to make an infantry leader. “What the hell are they talking about?” I wondered.

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Top Rated Comments   
The other tragedy of "ethnic cleansing" is where it's not happening. The black folks of N. Sudan, the black Left's biggest argument for Egyptian culture being black, suddenly become "Arabs" cleansing out blacks. Surprise, another Orwellian argument from the black Left.

Israel is cleansing a population in the West Bank that continues to grow despite the mass murders. Apparently Jewish settlers that clean out a few blocks of Arabs in E. Jerusalem rises to the level of genocide. Not fair but hardly "ethnic cleansing" in light of the very real fact Arab tank brigades were poised to cut Israel in two from, surprise, that very area. I guess kicking out people ethnically from staging areas is rather crude. Not quite as crude as trying to drive people into the sea, but crude.

Meanwhile over 5 million died in the recently ended Second Congo War which was the deadliest since Japan bought a conscience with nuclear credits. No agenda, no headlines. Blacks killing blacks. Nothing to see here. We believe in identity, not principle. 12 Palestinians are worth more than 5 million blacks. Move along, move along.

1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
When is obvious actually obvious? Morons who stretch the word "imperialism" to its absolute limit have no explanation for why America simply never went in and conquered the Middle East, or why we never enslaved Canada and Mexico.

Something's always where it ain't.

A real threat assessment also takes into account what a country would like to do, not what it CAN do. By that standard, every one raise their hands if they think the Middle East wouldn't conquer Europe if they could. Raise your hand if you think Russia shrank it's empire out of conscience. Everyone who thinks the Empire of Japan had a sudden attack of conscience about the same time we dropped a-bombs on them raise your hand.

But oh, look! We're not occupying Japan. What's that? Did they kick us out? Was that the unknown story of the Great Retreat newspapers refused to report?

As for ethnic groups only now finding their own course, the U.S. didn't unleash that. Go poke the U.K. in the eye. They're the one's who doted on drawing straight lines on maps. The result is that Iraqi, Syrian, Iranian and Turkish Kurds may someday have a country after about a zillion people die.

That's right, "imperialism" is just a little more than a frickin' Hardees in Tahrir Square or a Mc's in Legian, Bali.

And don't let politically correct morons on the Left off the hook for raising global ethnic awareness. Who knows how much damage those idiots have done among cultures once happy to live together. Now people who buy into that sad stuff see racism in their soup and cloud formations.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
As Ralph Peters had the audacity to point out years ago, the real tragedy of ethnic cleansing is that it works.

(That's not an endorsement, by him or by me -- just to be clear!)
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (35)
All Comments   (35)
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Excellent and eye opening Steve, thanks
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Mali and the Second Scramble for Africa Published on Mar 20, 2013 Pressfortruth.ca correspondent Tyrone Drummond takes a closer look at the ongoing situation in Mali with sociologist, former Canadian Soldier, and author of the book: Globalization of Nato, Mahdi Darius Nazemroaya.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hnnh1RkwHRE&feature=player_embedded#
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Wars and rumors of wars ...

The last generation to see war on a global scale is mostly dead and no one listens to those who are left. We who are here don't have the imagination to comprehend what another war on that scale will mean, so we go charging off into history having failed to learn from it.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Davidson and Rees-Mogg predicted a globe of many more countries, with fuzzier borders and a wide array of forms. We will see, they said, the return of Medieval-style marches, city-states, and even privately held commercial enterprises all sharing the map.

We called this the "1000 state sovereignty model" when I was in graduate business school 20 years ago. Yes, I think this is the most likely scenario for the future. It will certainly make "seasteading" easier to pursue from the political standpoint. With the world fragmented and no hegemonic power, the rest of the world is unlikely to object to a group of "nutty" transhumanists creating their own city-state out on the ocean so that they can pursue the development of all kinds of technologies (including radical life extension) free from the interference of luddite bureaucrats.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
http://athousandnations.com/

http://www.seasteading.org/

Its not about libertarianism or transhumanism, per se, even though these ideas may be what drives most of the current advocates. Its about increasing competition and reducing the monopoly-power of governments such that new forms of society and governance can emerge. A meta-system of competitive forms of government and human organization is vastly superior to what exists today. The purpose of seasteading is to bring about this meta-system.

Is it not silly to believe that everything there is to know about human nature and psychology has already been discovered or that all possible forms of human social organization have been invented?

Is it not likely that new forms of society will exist in 2100 or 2200 that we cannot even imagine today? It is silly to think otherwise.

Also, we are all different, with different dreams and goals, different likes and dislikes. It is really quite silly to believe that there is one perfect system, one perfect world-view that is optimized for all human beings.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
In a time of technological advances we're already becoming a societal population (ever increasing) domestically and globally, in which more and more manual labor is being replaced by computer controlled electro-mechanical machinery and devices creating an excess of idol, able bodied humans. Nobody is addressing this societal transformation. They're to consumed with irrelevant diversions of propagandized poltical partisan hackery!
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment

"Is it not likely that new forms of society will exist in 2100 or 2200 that we cannot even imagine today? It is silly to think otherwise."

Horse pucky. We have yet to come up with a form of societal organization that was not cataloged by the classical Greeks. It is not obvious that we'll come up with a new one in the next 200 years. Not saying it's impossible, but it seems reasonable to believe that we'll be picking from the same menu for some time yet.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Quite the contrary. I think a society comprised mostly of IQ 130 and above individuals who have indefinitely long youthful lifespans will be profoundly different than any society that exists today, let alone the ancient Greeks. Higher IQ people have a profoundly different worldview than those of, say, 100 or even 85. It is reasonable to assume that such people will comprise a separate mental class, rather than socioeconomic one, and will come up with different solutions than what we have now.

Your mentality is similar to those politicians in 1900 who wanted to close the patent office because they thought that everything that could possibly exist had already been invented.

No one can say for certain what the future will be. But I am confident in saying that the future is unbounded.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
And homosexuals can create their own state and show us how fast it fails. Cant wait for that one!

I would also like the Atheists to be given a homeland, where they can be free of religion and the religious can be free from there arseholery. LOL!
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Since the western alliances headed up by the U.S. and the UK, adopted by the CFR's nation-building strategies post WWII, the old USSR and communism was the central target of that containment nation-building strategy. So I would assume most would say they do in fact have a seat at the table in 'addition' to the seat granted them by the UN post WWII.

The matters of the Middle East are quite a different matter as developed again, by the CFR. American geophyscists in the '30s found the expansive oil shelves in parts of the ME all familiar too most today. While a very important find by America, it was a great strategic priority for the Brits. By the mid to late '50s America exploration of off-shore LA was in progress to augment the major producing inland areas of the Plains states. Foregoing a long disseration, by the '60s, America was 'capping' large numbers of oil and gas wells in the Plains states and more oil was then being imported for domestic uses. That imported oil was from the ME as it remains so today. There has been and remains, a long term static national security energy strategy in place. That stragey is very centric to the ME oil and gas reserves. There were/are a lot of perceived motives of 'benefit' thought to be significant to the CFR nation-building strategies, remembering, that most of the ME in those times lacked any significant economies. and the 'region' was common to the border of the old USSR -- that old thing of 'he who controls the natural resources controls....." Until OPEC was formed both the U.S. and the Brits received signifcant market discounts from the ME oil producers. So yes, the natural resource of oil, greatly in plays into the ME and to the containment nation-building strategies. Likewise, since 1947 and our strategic policies involving Iran and logistics lanes for commerce -- and Eygpt and such strategic positioning throughout the pacific to contain communism in China, thus, Korea, Vietnam, Thailand, Guam, Philippines, etc.

Yes, we're all around the world involved in constainment nation-building perpetuating American style democracy, Christianity and Captialism.

Ron Paul? A twig in the wind! Now, his father is quite a different thing. I think he was spot on trying too effect a national discussion around continued nation building and its ROI -- trillions of dollars spent, well over a million 'American' lives lost and millions more maimed for life. Does the nearly 70 years of experience today, disclose successes paying economic and social benefit to America and the world to a degree worth continuing such strategies?
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Watching the low grade cold war between the Red and the Blue states in the US makes me think a split into "marches"and the rise of "city states" is not that an extreme an idea anymore. Some states are starting to get real polarized internally urban areas vs suburban and rural for example.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Never be paranoid. Look out!!! What's that behind you!!!???
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
" A fair sampling of such paranoia gets posted on the comments section of this site."

I think you are paranoid.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Are you attributing to Steve what he is actually quoting from Spengler? Methinks you need to read a bit more carefully.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
When I learned the 9/11 victims would have broken the law if they interfered with the hijackers, I knew we were through. A nation of sheep.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment

"...elsewhere it’s also empowered groupthink minorities with great big historical axes to grind..."

Yeah! Like neo-puritan progressives, rednecks, blacks, and hispanics...oops. Guess "elsewhere" ain't as far away as it used to be.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
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