Just what we need — a nice healthy debate that will be rather one-sided because liberals are already calling anyone who agrees with an RNC tweet commemorating the arrest of Rosa Parks 58 years ago a racist.

In truth, the tweet is inelegant:

Recognizing the inadequacy, the RNC followed up with another tweet:

 

Think Progress (“When You Think Progress, Think Idiocy”) was very helpful in telling us that racism is not over, and that it has actually increased since Barack Obama became president:

Racism, of course, hasn’t ended and may have actually increased since the election of President Obama in 2008.

Some research contends that “racism cost the president more than five million votes in 2008 and 2012″ and a 2012 survey from the Associated Press found that “51 percent of Americans explicitly express anti-black prejudice, up from 48 percent in 2008.” The survey concluded that 79 percent of Republicans are likely to express outright racial prejudice, compared to 32 percent of Democrats.

Following the re-election of Obama in 2012, Colin Powell publicly condemned the GOP’s “dark vein of intolerance” and the party’s repeated use of racial code words to oppose the president and rally white conservative voters. Without mentioning names, Powell singled out former Mitt Romney surrogate and New Hampshire Gov. John Sununu for calling Obama “lazy” and Sarah Palin, who, Powell charged, used slavery-era terms to describe Obama.

This is why the right loses this argument before it even starts. When calling someone “lazy” becomes a term of racial intolerance, what’s the use of debating? And which “slavery era terms” did Palin use? Are those terms still in wide use today?

A little specificity, please, before you smear a public figure as a bigot.