Stretch, grab a late afternoon cup of caffeine and get caught up on the most important news of the day with our Coffee Break newsletter. These are the stories that will fill you in on the world that's spinning outside of your office window - at the moment that you get a chance to take a breath.
Sign up now to save time and stay informed!

Eight Things Feminism Could Fight for in Saudi Arabia

Feminists claim that the patriarchy keeps women down in the United States. Despite the fact that the law expressly forbids a woman's sex to be a factor  before the law, they still claim that women are treated like second-class citizens in this country.

However, if feminist wanted to really fight for equality, there's plenty of work to be done elsewhere as well. Let's look at the Muslim world for a moment.

Here's a list of a few things women aren't allowed to do in Saudi Arabia, one of the more advanced nations in the Middle East:

While there has been promise of several reforms for female citizens so far just a handful of the important decisions a woman in Saudi Arabia still cannot make for herself include:

Marry

Permission to marry must be granted by your wali, or guardian. Women who seek to marry foreigners must obtain approval to do by the ministry of interior, and marriage to non-Muslims is so difficult as to be impossible.

Open a bank account

While there are now a few jobs women in the Kingdom are allowed to do without male permission, such as working as shop assistants or at fairgrounds, they are not allowed to have their own bank account to control their finances without permission.

Get a fair trial

The testimony of a woman is only worth half a man’s in Saudi Arabia’s legal system. Women also only receive half the inheritance their brothers are entitled to.

Travel

Passports and identification cards must be obtained with the permission of a male guardian. Women are usually also not allowed to leave the home alone.

Dress how they want

“Dressing for beauty” is illegal, and modest clothing and make up encouraged.

Full length abayas - a long coat worn over other clothes - must be worn by all women in public, although in recent years rules over the colour, decoration and how headscarves are worn have been relaxed.

Wow. Just imagine how bad it is in Iran or in the ISIS-controlled regions of Iraq and Syria.

This is what boggles the minds of so many critics of feminism. How can you stand here and lecture us on the inequities of the American system with regard to women, talking about how oppressed you are, when there are women who aren't allowed to leave their house without permission?

Even worse is when these feminists not only complain about "Islamophobia" when anyone criticizes Muslims  but also side with someone like Linda Sarsour, who has literally called for Sharia law in this country. They side with the people who want to enslave them against the people who simply think some of their arguments are ridiculous.

How does that work out, anyway?