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Obamacare's Absurd Food Labeling Law to Begin Soon

If I were to point to anything in the ironically named Affordable Care Act as being its most stupid regulation, I have little doubt that you could manage to find to something even more ridiculous in it. Such is the nature of the worst piece of legislation in recent history.

However, another rule is set to take effect soon that might just take the cake. Or pizza, in this case:

The nation’s franchise restaurants are about one month away from the imposition of new nutritional-labeling rules dreamed up by the Obama administration, another gift of the grievously misnamed Affordable Care Act. For outlets of brands with 20 or more locations, that means posting signs in the shop with calorie counts for every item on the menu and for every variation on that item.

That’s probably not such a big deal if you are, say, Raising Cane’s, and your menu ranges from one chicken finger to 100 chicken fingers. It’s a little different if you are a pizza shop, because pizza has a lot of variables.

A lot.

“We did the math,” says Tim McIntyre, an executive at Domino’s and chairman of (not making this up) the American Pizza Community, a thing that exists. “With gluten-free crusts to thick to hand-tossed to pan pizza, multiple sizes, cheeses, toppings ... there are about 34 million possible combinations.” He does a pretty good deadpan delivery: “That is difficult to put on a menu.”

That’s going to be a big sign.

Pretty stupid, right?

However, as they say on TV: but wait -- there's more.

The law requires these listings to be inside the store. The problem is, places like Domino's and other pizza delivery places get the vast majority of their orders either online or via phone calls to the store. Remarkably few people enter a store, look at a menu, and order.