Indiana Voter Fraud Investigation Spreads to 9 Counties

A voter fraud investigation in Indiana has expanded to include nine counties, the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette reported Wednesday. And at the center of the investigation is a voter registration organization backed by a Democrat insider and former Bill Clinton staffer.

Indiana State Police raided the "Indiana Voter Registration Project" in Indianapolis after they received a tip last week that hundreds of records may contain fake names, addresses and dates of birth.

Barry Schust, Allen County’s Republican voter registration board member, said about 1,000 forms from the group were submitted to the local office. About 150 had addresses that weren’t in Allen County, he said, and more than half of the forms “had some form of issue.”

“There’s many that are incomplete or nearly illegible, and a major (concern) is where you write the driver’s license or state ID number or Social Security number,” Schust said.

“There’s an option to check ‘none,’ but it’s a rare occasion to be a citizen and have neither,” he said. But on many of the forms, “none” was checked, he said.

Copies of the group’s forms were turned over to state police Tuesday morning, Schust said.

Also Tuesday morning, state police detectives raided the Indiana Voter Registration Project’s office in Indianapolis and announced that an investigation that began in August had expanded from Hendricks and Marion counties to include Delaware, Hamilton, Hancock, Johnson, Lake and Madison counties, in addition to Allen County.

“The expanded number of counties involved leads investigators to believe that the total number of potentially fraudulent records may be in the hundreds, thus creating a potential to disenfranchise many voters” who thought they were legitimately signing up to vote, a state police news release said.

Victims may not discover the fraud until they go to vote, and that would result in them having to cast a provisional ballot, the news release said.

Investigators said the potentially fraudulent information included a combination of made-up names and addresses, real names with made-up or incorrect addresses, and false dates of births with real names as well as “combinations of all these examples” and, possibly, other irregularities.

Police said that the "changed voter registration forms" could cause legitimate voters to be turned away on election day because their registration won't match who they are or where they live.