The PJ Tatler

Dems Get Taste of Obama Churlishness, Spit It Back Out

Barack Obama’s signal triumph has been fooling a large segment of the American public that he is a “nice guy,” when in fact the opposite is true. He’s a nasty, mean-spirited, graceless, classless punk who treats anyone who disagrees with him with contempt. But, hey, it was all fun and games for the Left until he turned his bitter tongue on them:

President Obama’s sharp rebuke of Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D) over his ambitious trade agenda is backfiring in the House, where the personal attacks are alienating the same Democrats the president is courting for votes. Warren, a freshman liberal from Massachusetts, has emerged as among the fiercest and most visible opponents of Obama’s trade wish list, which includes deals with countries in Asia and Europe the president is hoping to make a legacy of his White House tenure.

The tough tenor was designed to rally the backing of more Democrats, particularly in the House, where GOP leaders are struggling to find the 217 votes needed to pass the fast-track bill aimed at facilitating those pacts. Instead, Obama’s rhetoric — he said his critics were “just wrong” in an interview with Yahoo published Saturday — seems to have exacerbated tensions between Democrats and the White House, which could make it tougher to move one of the president’s top legislative priorities through Congress this year.

“You and I can disagree about policy, but I can’t call you a bad person or impugn your motives or anything else — except at great risk,” Rep. Jim McDermott (Wash.), a liberal Democrat who’s undecided but leaning against the trade bill, said Wednesday. “Civility in this business is important, because tomorrow I have to work with you, tomorrow I may need you badly,” he added. “A lot of people are standing around saying, ‘You know something, this is getting to be a personal thing, and that’s not the way we want to go here.’ … He went quite a ways with her and I think probably he won’t go that far again.”

You know things are bad when a thoroughly vile piece of work like McDermott — an open practitioner of the politics of personal destruction — starts calling for “civility” among moonbats.

The tensions underlying the trade debate have highlighted a long-standing problem for the president: namely, his penchant for negotiating legislation in ways that leave even his closest allies on Capitol Hill feeling excluded from the process. “We’re the children at the kids’ table during the negotiations,” Rep. Mark Pocan (D-Wis.), an opponent of the trade legislation, said Wednesday.

“We’ve had the president’s back over and over and over again — and I can disagree with the president and still have his back — [but] it’d be nice if the approach was reciprocal,” Pocan added. “Elizabeth Warren agrees with Barack Obama on 98-99 percent of issues, and to decide to take her to task on the 1 percent is just a very ineffective way to gain friends.”

Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha.