The PJ Tatler

In Today's Least Surprising News, Sandra Fluke Likes 'Litmus Tests,' May Run for Office

Is this less of a surprise than learning that Rosie O’Donnell is a horrible whack job? I don’t think so.

Fluke stressed that she was specifically appealing to potential female candidates who favor access to birth control.

“Access” isn’t the issue on the ObamaCare mandate, never was. How many CVS’s does it take to keep Georgetown up on its pills? Fluke, a 31-year-old activist and law student, either knows this but is dishonest about it, or doesn’t have a clue. She attends Georgetown law, so cluelessness probably isn’t the issue.

“But I want to be clear, this doesn’t mean that it’s just any woman in the room,” she said, citing the two women called by Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) to testify against the mandate to cover contraception at religious universities. “It has to be a woman who’s focused on representing how policies will affect all of us. And this doesn’t mean that it should be a political litmus test, that they need to be Democratic women or they need to be Republican women. But there should be a litmus test that they be pro-women…And it should be a litmus test that applies to male candidates as well.”

Clearly, a nation that’s broke should prioritize turning lifestyle options into yet another government entitlement.

Watch for Fluke to earn zero condemnation from the left for this, in which she puts her contraception intolerance above all else in time and space. There are good litmus tests and bad litmus tests. When a conservative considers applying a litmus test to defend the right to life, that’s baaaad. But when a leftist such as Fluke applies a litmus test to see whether officeholders are on board with her conscience violating birth control welfare queen act, that’s gooood. Sen. Kelly Ayotte and former Dem Rep. Kathy Dalkemper would not pass Fluke’s test.

On to the even less surprising news:

“Numerous American women have actually written to me in the last few weeks to say that I should run for office,” Fluke noted during a panel discussion on women’s history hosted by Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.). “And maybe someday I will. But for now, I actually have to finish law school.”