Downstream of Green

And upstream too. The Daily Mail looks at the Chinese industrial area supplying the magnets for Europe's clean wind farms. It's a wasteland. The Chinese industrial area that is.

The reality is that, as Britain flaunts its environmental credentials by speckling its coastlines and unspoiled moors and mountains with thousands of wind turbines, it is contributing to a vast man-made lake of poison in northern China. This is the deadly and sinister side of the massively profitable rare-earths industry that the ‘green’ companies profiting from the demand for wind turbines would prefer you knew nothing about.

Hidden out of sight behind smoke-shrouded factory complexes in the city of Baotou, and patrolled by platoons of security guards, lies a five-mile wide ‘tailing’ lake. It has killed farmland for miles around, made thousands of people ill and put one of China’s key waterways in jeopardy.

This vast, hissing cauldron of chemicals is the dumping ground for seven million tons a year of mined rare earth after it has been doused in acid and chemicals and processed through red-hot furnaces to extract its components.

But the Chinese don't vote in British elections. They are not a relevant constituency for the Greens.  So who gives a damn?

Now that you know what is behind windfarms, let's look at what underpins the clean disposal of ships that can longer be broken up in Europe. Half of them are broken up in Alang, India.

Large supertankers, car ferries, container ships, and a dwindling number of ocean liners are beached during high tide, and as the tide recedes, hundreds of manual laborers dismantle each ship, salvaging what they can and reducing the rest into scrap. Tens of thousands of jobs are supported by this activity and millions of tons of steel are recovered. ...

The salvage yards at Alang have generated controversy about working conditions, workers' living conditions, and the impact on the environment. One major problem is that despite many serious work-related injuries, the nearest full service hospital is 50 kilometres away in Bhavnagar. Alang itself is served by a small Red Cross hospital that offers only limited services.

There's another major ship graveyard on the coast of Madagascar. But it's in Africa and they don't vote in Western elections either.  Although "environmentalists" are often happy to see oil prices rise because it prices "carbon" out of the reach of consumers, its greatest effect on the Third World has been to raise food prices. The unrest in the Middle East are directly the result of unaffordable food.

But that's OK. The Voluntary Human Extinction Project believes  "the biosphere of the planet Earth would be better off without humans. In VHEMT's view, the human race is akin to an "exotic invader", whose population is out of control and threatens other species with extinction, and only removal of the human race can restore the natural ecological order."

And if there's trouble in the Middle East, why just get America to bombing the living s**t out of the unrestful natives with B-2 bombers and the sophisticates can thereafter take the lead. Where extinction is concerned, why not just get the natives and the bitter clingers to kill each other. Extinction can wait a little, put off till the next glorious sunset. You know, "I'll gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today."

And how can anyone forget the reluctance of those on Cape Code to build wind-farms that might ruin their view?  It's amazing how unattractive Green becomes when it acquires a human face. Or maybe that's how unattractive the human view becomes when they see the Green Face.

How can people be so heartless

How can people be so cruel

Easy to be hard

Easy to be cold ...

And especially people

Who care about strangers

Who say they care about social injustice

Do you only

Care about the bleeding crowd

How about a needing friend?

I need a friend.

If you need a friend, buy a dog.


"No Way In" print edition at Amazon

Tip Jar or Subscribe for $5