News & Politics

Expelled Indiana Student Claims Rape Accuser Coerced Him Into Sex

The lack of due process for men accused of rape on college campuses is an issue many Americans are concerned with, especially parents with sons of college age. After all, it takes so little for a student to have his life destroyed over a baseless allegation.

In this case, a male student says his accuser had in fact coerced him into sex:

[Aaron] Farrer didn’t want to have sex with her. He had been taught in his ROTC program that “drunk people aren’t supposed to sleep together,” and while he didn’t think either was drunk, both had consumed alcohol and he wanted to play it safe. (He claims to remember the entire evening despite the several drinks he consumed.)

Zerfoss, in fact, “seemed fully cognizant,” he said. She wasn’t slurring her words or fumbling, and she was insistent that they have sex.

“She kept calling my name,” grabbing his hands and putting them on her body, Farrer claimed. When he tried to spurn her advances by making small talk or offering her water, she rejected.

“Eventually, I gave in.”

The following week, Farrer was called into the campus police station where he worked. A supervisor said a female student had filed a sexual-assault allegation against him with the Title IX office, which then went to campus police by virtue of Farrer’s job.

Aaron Farrer was expelled — despite the police finding insufficient evidence to prosecute him for anything.

During his hearing, he was never allowed to question his accuser. He was only afforded the opportunity to give someone unaffiliated with him a list of questions, and that didn’t work out particularly well for Farrer:

They testified in front of three administrators. Trial administrator Amber Monroe, who would leave IUB two months later, didn’t allow Farrer to cross-examine his accuser, nor confront her with any of the inconsistencies in her story that Farrer had come to learn.

He was limited to creating a list of suggested questions for Monroe to ask Zerfoss, and she declined to ask many of them, Farrer said.

Farrer reports that he’s had difficulty getting into another school. His career dreams seem to have been dashed because he was punished for something he denies without evidence.

Further, Farrer describes being manipulated into sex, an act some feminists claim constitutes rape when a man does it to a woman (to be fair, some feminists will argue that it’s rape if a woman does it to a man as well).

We have a way of avoiding all this chaos. It’s called due process.

It makes it far more difficult for innocent people to have their lives destroyed because of something they didn’t do. However, in their effort to appear to be “doing something,” both government and college officials have strangled due process in the cases of men accused of rape. Further, they seem unwilling to entertain the possibility that a guy like Farrer may have actually been the victim.