Culture

Even Bill Maher Is Telling the Left to Chillax on Abortion

(Janet Van Ham/HBO via AP)

While the radical left is treating us to the usual apocalyptic predictions about what will happen if Roe v. Wade is overturned, Bill Maher, the host of HBO’s Real Time, is telling them to calm down and relax because things aren’t nearly as bad as they’re making them out to be.

How does he know? He’s done his homework.

“I learned things this week … that are pretty basic things, that I did not know about abortion. Like in Europe, the modern countries of Europe are way more restrictive than we are or what they’re even proposing,” Maher said of the draft opinion of Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization. “If you are pro-choice, you would like it a lot less in Germany, and Italy, and France, and Spain, and Switzerland. Did you know that? I didn’t know that.”

Maher continued, “I learned most people who are pro-life are women. I did not know that. Most abortions are from … mothers, people who have a kid … And I thought this was interesting, most abortions now — even when you go to a clinic — are done with the pill. The pill. And pills are easy to get in America.”

“So, you know, for the people who say we’re going back to 1973, we’re not. That’s just factually inaccurate.”

Related: Democrat Analysts Not Convinced Overturning Roe Will Save Them in Midterms

The Mississippi law at issue in Dobbs v. Jackson bans most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy. Despite all the outrage from the radical left, this law reflects mainstream views on abortion in the United States.

Maher also mocked the left’s insistance that Roe is “settled law.”

“This whole bulls*** argument about, ‘Well, it’s settled law.’ So was segregation. Plessy vs. Ferguson was ‘settled law’ in 1896, and thank God somebody said let’s unsettle it. So that’s a bulls*** argument,” Maher said, echoing arguments I made last week.

Guest Paul Begala, a CNN contributor, disagreed with Maher and kept trying to drum up fear, including repeating the ridiculous claim that the court would eventually ban interracial marriage.

“But Clarence Thomas is [in] an interracial marriage,” Maher pointed out. “I guess what I’m saying is, I really feel like abortion is unique. It is, because either — you just have this view that it’s murder. I could put the argument on a hat when people talk about a woman’s right. ‘Murder isn’t a right.’ If you think it’s murder — I don’t, again, crazy me …”