News & Politics

January 6 Defendant Back in Jail for Breaking Terms of Release and Using the Internet

AP Photo/Paul Sancya

January 6 defendant Douglas Jensen from Des Moines, Iowa, is back in jail, this time for using the internet to listen to the news and watch the election-fraud special produced by MyPillow guy Mike Lindell.

Jensen was arrested January 9, and remained in jail until June 24 after he petitioned a judge for release, stating that he is “a victim of numerous conspiracy theories that were being fed to him over the internet by a number of very clever people, who were uniquely equipped with slight, if any, moral or social consciousness.”

Jensen swore off his QAnon beliefs and agreed to the judge’s terms of release, which included house arrest, not using a cell phone, and staying off the internet. Two weeks after his release, Jensen was back on the interwebs.

Related: QAnon Shaman, in Jail Since January 9, Agrees to Plea Deal

“Frankly, I think it’s probably a logical inference that there are no conditions that I can impose that will ensure Mr. Jensen does not pose a risk to the community,” Judge Timothy Kelly said Thursday. “I made Mr. Jensen’s conditions of release extraordinarily clear.”

In August, prosecutors claim, a pretrial services officer caught Jensen in his garage streaming a program on a Wi-Fi-enabled iPhone.

Jensen first claimed the phone belonged to his daughter, then he said his wife left the news on for him before she left for work, according to the service officer’s report. Later, he admitted to spending two days streaming a cyber symposium held by Lindell.

FACT-O-RAMA! At his Stop The Steal symposium, Lindell claimed he was attacked.

 

Jensen’s lawyer, Christopher Davis, didn’t contest the fact that Jensen had violated the terms of his pretrial release, though he did call the act of arresting a man listening to a news broadcast in his garage “Orwellian.” He also acknowledged that far-right-wing broadcasts he listened to illicitly were what led Jensen to the Capitol initially.

Davis argued that Jensen is not dangerous, and he may “struggle with addiction to some information on the internet.”

“He’s not out there beating people with poles. He doesn’t have explosive materials on his computer,” Davis said. “This man has some issues he needs to come to grips with. Apparently, he hasn’t come to grips with them yet.”