Should Everyone Consume Less Sodium?


The opening words of a novel are acknowledged to be among the most important of the book, my own favorite being Chesterton’s "The human race, to which so many of my readers belong.…" But rivaling these words for impact are those of the Methods section of the abstracts of two papers in a recent edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. The first was "We studied 102,216 adults from 18 countries," surely the the equal of, say, "There was no possibility of going for a walk that day" (Jane Eyre). The second, by the same authors, was "We obtained morning fasting urine samples from 101,945 persons in 17 countries," again easily the equal of "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times" (A Tale of Two Cities).

However, this was science, not literature. The object of the papers was to cast light on the association, long noted, between sodium intake in the diet and high blood pressure, and to help decide whether a reduction in the sodium intake of entire populations would be a worthwhile public health measure. High blood pressure is one of the principle causes of stroke and heart attack, which are themselves one of the principle causes of death in the world.