8 Lessons I've Learned By Self-Publishing 3 Kindle E-books

Book publishing back in the day

When I was in my 20s and 30s, my dream was to publish the Great American Junk Novel. I had no illusions about my ability (or, rather, inability) to write something profound, but I truly believed I could write a Bridges of Madison County or Da Vinci Code. I was wrong. After innumerable efforts, I gave up. I have no imagination, no sense of character, and I'm incapable of writing dialog.

Thanks to the blogosphere, however, I discovered in my 40s that, while I'm not and never will be a novelist, I am an essayist. Over the past decade, I've written over 11,000 essays, which easily qualifies me for "expert" status. My blog has become a vast repository of my thoughts on just about everything: politics (mostly politics), parenting, education, Hollywood, social issues, national security, travel -- you name it, and I've probably written about it.

Considering how many hours I've spent at the keyboard, I've always hoped that I could monetize my blog. Unfortunately, while I've got a solid, and very dear to me, following of readers who genuinely like the way I think and write, I've never leveraged my way into the Big Time amongst conservative bloggers. Not being in the Big Time means that any monetization I've done has earned me just enough money to buy a few books, not to make a mortgage payment or two.

A few years ago, it occurred to me that I might be able to make some money if I took my writings to a new readership. That's how I decided to try my hand at self-publishing. I saw it all clearly:  I would assemble my essays, package them attractively, upload them at Kindle Direct Publishing, and sell them for a profit on Amazon. It seemed so easy....

Sadly, it wasn't easy, at least not the first time around. That didn't deter me from publishing a second e-book and, just recently, a third. Each book has been easier than the one before, so I'd like to share with you some lessons I've learned, many of which I learned the hard way.