A Baseball Mom's Take on Richard Sherman's NFL Postgame Rant

"We're talking about football here, and a lot of people took it further than football," Sherman said. "I was on a football field showing passion. Maybe it was misdirected and immature, but this is a football field. I wasn't committing any crimes and doing anything illegal. I was showing passion after a football game." -- Richard Sherman, Seattle Seahawks cornerback

Our family's first foray into youth sports didn't go quite as planned. The female coach who had volunteered to coach our son's T-ball team told the children on the first day that the players who didn't get dirty would get candy at the end of the game. A few parents took this well-meaning (but misguided) mother aside and explained to her a few things about the nature of boys and something about the physical properties of  baseball and dirt and informed her that their sons would not be participating in her little "clean game" nonsense. This was our introduction to the ubiquitous drama that permeates youth sports leagues.

My husband and I spent a lot of years coaching youth sports as our sons grew up -- baseball, soccer, basketball -- mostly because we were the only parents who didn't drop-and-run. We weren't savvy enough in the early years to realize that you are by default the U4 soccer coach if you're the only parent left on the field five minutes after practice is scheduled to begin (other parents, making a beeline to the parking lot, shouted to us, "The whistle and cones are in the blue crate! We'll see you in an hour. Good luck!")

We always believed it was important for our boys to participate in team sports, not only for physical fitness reasons, but because they were of the male gender and we thought that participating in sports would be a good way for them to learn to control and channel the aggression that is inherent to their maleness.