NBC's Jane Timm Sparks Outrage in Attacking Trump's Election Commission

Comic delight follows when you are attacked by NBC in a story written by a former fact checker for Rolling Stone.

That’s what reporter Jane C. Timm did when she wrote a fact-optional attack on President Trump’s Election Integrity Commission, and me in particular. Timm’s piece is a case study in how rabid anti-Trump interests are undermining the priorities of the electorate that won President Trump the White House.

Timm’s attack on the Election Integrity Commission also serves as a nifty example of the furtive assembly line that produces these anti-Trump attacks: Funding by extremist foundations, harvesting of raw materials by far-left special interest groups, packaging and pushing of talking points, and finally the publication by lapdog reporters who dislike President Trump and long for a Democrat in the White House.

"Resisting" isn’t done in a day. It takes time and money and paid staff.

Jane C. Timm (Instagram photo)

The best resisting always starts with a headline designed to incite. In Timm’s case:

Vote Fraud Crusader J. Christian Adams Sparks Outrage

“Sparking outrage” is a popular theme. Anyone who disagrees with media elites is liable to “spark outrage,” with a bit of elbow grease by reporters. Outrage is the currency of the resist movement. Best of all, it doesn’t take much sparking, or much outrage, to a headline make, and often the reporters themselves make the sparks. If the reporters don't spark the outrage, they can rely on a variety of special interest groups to deliver the sparked outrage in heaps.

Note the counterpart headline above, as Timm's reporting has also sparked outrage, as we will see below.

Timm’s beef is that my organization, the Public Interest Legal Foundation, discovered that Virginia had removed serious numbers of registered voters for citizenship defects and have brought federal lawsuits to force the cleanup of corrupted voter rolls. Timm offends all of the other hardworking lawyers at PILF, and other organizations, working on the same issues when she calls me a “one man wrecking ball.”

Timm gets it wrong when she writes:

Working with the nonprofit American Civil Rights Union, Adams filed his first voter roll maintenance lawsuits in the spring of 2013.

The former fact checker needs a fact checker. My first voter roll maintenance cases were filed with Judicial Watch, not the ACRU, and against Ohio. They were filed in 2012, not 2013. I sought comments from Timm about her errors prior to the publication of this story. She did not reply.

“The report that Timm wrote is one of the most unfair and dishonest news reports I have ever read,” Hans von Spakovsky (a fellow commission member) told me in a phone interview. Outrage sparked.