Carnegie Mellon University: Bigots and Turds

Two men who built America into a great nation, Andrew Carnegie and Andrew Mellon, helped build a great university -- Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh.  But like so many other American campuses, it has descended into rot.

Consider the products of the School of Art at Carnegie Mellon, commonly called CMU.

The first CMU student in the news seeking an art degree is the anti-Catholic bigot Katherine O'Connor.  O'Connor thought it would be edgy to walk around campus half-dressed as the pope, and half-dressed in nothing.  The order of those halves gave her the opportunity to creatively employ her art studies in a way you can read about here.  Her bottom half being naked allowed her to add to the "costume."

There's a problem with parading around campus half-dressed -- it's illegal in Pittsburgh.  O'Connor is going to learn the hard way that while her bigotry isn't illegal, her antics were.  She was arrested along with Robb Godshaw, her criminal co-conspirator. She now faces charges of indecent exposure.

O'Connor is an art student at CMU (for now), and some Google work will reveal much about her life which I won't reveal here.  It also reveals much about CMU's art program.

Consider Professor Golan Levin's class that O'Connor was taking in the School of Design: Electronic Design II.  Not only did O'Connor take this class, but so did Connie Dai.

Dai's final project for CMU credit, which she describes here, is a "lovely be-jeweled turd that talks."  For this she received academic credit from (purportedly) one of America's elite universities.

Andrew Mellon should be a household name.  In addition to financing the industrial growth of America, he made one of the most philanthropic gifts to the United States ever -- his art collection and the building to hold it on the National Mall, the National Gallery of Art.  Here you will find original works from Mellon's collection by da Vinci, Monet, Rembrandt, van Gogh, Raphael, and more.  There are no talking be-jeweled turds.

Also read: 

Can Anyone Learn How to Appreciate Art?