Hillary Clinton's Insidious Threat to Traditional Christianity

Conservative Christian support for Donald Trump has become something of a scandal of late. But no matter how odious the Republican nominee's faults may be, religious believers must not be fooled — Hillary Clinton represents a terrifying threat to religious freedom and traditional faith in general.

Last April, Clinton infamously declared that "deep-seated cultural codes, religious beliefs, and structural biases have to be changed" in order to make way for abortion and other forms of "reproductive health care." These remarks, given at the sixth annual Women in the World Summit, are fully in keeping not only with other denigrating speeches she has given about religious beliefs, but even with her colleagues' political work behind the scenes, as recently revealed by WikiLeaks.

For years, Clinton and her associates have demonstrated a contempt for traditional religious beliefs and an insidious effort to change them by whatever means necessary.

One such effort was revealed by WikiLeaks. In an email from February 2012, Sandy Newman, president and founder of the progressive nonprofit Voices for Progress, wrote to John Podesta (now Clinton's campaign chairman) that "there needs to be a Catholic Spring [like the Arab Spring], in which Catholics themselves demand the end of a middle ages dictatorship and the beginning of a little democracy and respect for gender equality in the Catholic Church."

Podesta, rather than dismissing the idea of infiltrating a Christian church and trying to force it to reject longstanding doctrine, said he had already attempted to do this. "We created Catholics in Alliance for the Common Good to organize for a movement like this. Likewise Catholics United," he replied. The first group Podesta mentioned, Catholics in Alliance for the Common Good, is funded by George Soros and pushes left-wing ideologies which are inconsistent with Catholic doctrine.

In another email to Podesta, from March 2011, Center for American Progress fellow John Halpin argued that conservative Catholics "must be attracted to the systematic thought and severely backwards gender relations and must be totally unaware of Christian democracy." (emphasis added.)

Jen Palmieri, now Clinton's communications director, responded, "I imagine they think it is the most socially acceptable politically conservative religion. Their rich friends wouldn't understand if they became evangelicals." Halpin responded, "Excellent point. They can throw around 'Thomistic' thought and 'subsidiarity' and sound sophisticated because no one knows what the hell they're talking about."

As an evangelical Protestant, I am both familiar with those ideas, and offended on behalf of my Catholic "separated brethren." Much of the way Americans see the world is heavily influenced by St. Thomas Aquinas, and the Founding Fathers' idea of federalism arguably traces back to subsidiarity.

Next Page: Clinton herself compared opposition to the LGBT agenda to honor killings and female genital mutilation.