Culture

Unfortunately Named 'Meat Patch' Could Help Vegetarians and Vegans With Cravings

(Image: phouavang82 via Pixabay)

File this one under “Too Weird to Pass Up.” A British plant-based (irritating phrase) food company called Strong Roots has teamed up with a boxer who may or may not have taken one too many shots to the head to promote a “meat patch” that, according to the boxer’s Instagram post, has “scratch and sniff technology to help with the cravings.”

The New York Post:

This patch is bringing home the bacon — or at least the aroma of it.

Charles Spence, a scientist specializing in experimental psychology out of England’s Oxford University, has teamed up with vegan frozen food brand Strong Roots to create a “meat patch” to help repentant carnivores curb their cravings.

Tommy “TNT” Fury, a British boxer and former “Love Island” contestant, is hawking the sticker on social media.

This next part confuses me a bit:

“Studies have shown that scent can reduce food cravings,” Spence tells The Independent. “Experiencing food-related cues such as smelling a bacon aroma, can lead us to imagine the act of eating that food.”

I’m not an old guy, but I’m not that young anymore either. Never in my considerable experience has the smell of a food I love made me want it less. This is either some brilliant counterintuitive behavior modification or a truckload of hooey.

Here is something I don’t get about the plant-based burgers and meat patches and whatever other faux carnivore experience stuff is on the market: if you’re craving bacon, shouldn’t you probably rethink your commitment to vegetarianism or veganism?

I understand people who are morally opposed to eating animals or are vegetarians for religious reasons, but if you’re craving a burger, have a freaking burger.

It’s probably healthier for you anyway.

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PJ Media Associate Editor Stephen Kruiser is the author ofDon’t Let the Hippies ShowerandStraight Outta Feelings: Political Zen in the Age of Outrage,” both of which address serious subjects in a humorous way. Monday through Friday he edits PJ Media’s “Morning Briefing.”