Culture

WATCH: Yale Students Sign Petition to Ban Halloween on Campus

Yale students sign Campus Reform petition to ban Halloween. Via YouTube.

A reporter from Campus Reform recently visited Yale University with a petition to ban Halloween on the New Haven, Connecticut campus, and the response he got was depressingly predictable. Many students agreed to sign their names to the petition.

All month long, the conservative website has been focusing on the fairly new phenomenon on college campuses — the intense opposition among students and staff to Halloween celebrations.  Students have been led to believe that even the most innocuous costumes are misogynistic, body-shaming, insensitive, racist, and/or cultural appropriating.

In 2015, students at Yale famously protested a professor who criticized the school’s efforts to censor Halloween costumes. Professor Nicholas Christakis dared to point out that college campuses have become “places of censure and prohibition.” The snowflakes screamed, cried, and hurled profanities at Christakis before stomping off to their safe spaces.

Campus Reform wanted to know if the environment at Yale had gotten more or less hostile for Halloween in the two years since.

“A lot of students on campus are concerned about the rise of cultural appropriation that happens surrounding Halloween,” the Campus Reform reporter told one prospective petition signer in his best virtue-signalling voice.  “Every year it leaves students feeling hurt and feeling out of place here on campus,” he told a couple of others. “We’re concerned that the school is promoting Halloween which is really an archaic tradition that doesn’t really have a place here.”

Instead of laughing and shooing him away, the students gave him a fair hearing — and many signed the petition.

One male student with a man-bun apparently didn’t want to be out-virtue-signalled by Cabot.

“[T]his is affecting people’s lives, you’re taking narratives away and I’ve seen that too often,” he fretted. “So I definitely support it [the petition].”

Cabot Phillips, the reporter, said, “I received signature after signature.” He also said he had “no idea how easy it would be.”