Get PJ Media on your Apple

VodkaPundit

Open is Better

May 16th, 2013 - 11:02 am

Android is now the mobile-platform target for malware. I mean, there really isn’t a second place. Here’s the chart via Apple Insider based on data from F-Secure Labs.

Open is Better

I’m not even sure Nokia even produces Symbian phones for the first world anymore, so that small spike might just represent Nigerians scamming one another. Stranger things have happened, especially in tech.

The situation is worse than even the raw numbers suggest:

While researchers say the number of malware types is rising significantly, of greater concern is the rise of “highly specialized suppliers” who “provide commoditized malware services” that specifically target weaknesses in the Android platform, resulting in a situation where the “Android malware ecosystem is beginning to resemble to that which surrounds Windows.”

Scammers single out Android users with cons that prompt them to update components like Adobe Flash, or direct them to services or job offers that request installation permissions from the user. Once granted, the malware installs code to either make a series of paid calls when the user is sleeping, or install SMS spyware designed to intercept the user’s banking details over what appears to be a secure connection.

I’d love for you to tell me how awesome your Android anti-virus and anti-phishing apps are — you are using them, yes? — but I can’t hear you over the sound of my unmolested iPhone.

Comments are closed.

All Comments   (6)
All Comments   (6)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
I do actually use a security app on my Android tablet, which I also use in its iOS form on my phone. I also always lock up the house when I leave, and my truck when I park it.

Those of us who've lived with Windows since forever find that such habits are hard to break. It's the hothouse flowers of Appledom that would be vulnerable if ever they were to find themselves outside the barbed wire. Such is the domesticated life.
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
Yep. Been there, done that. This is just the latest iteration of how Apple rawks and MS sucks.

As syberpunk pointed out, it's less a case of iOS being more secure than Apple being more careful. A more objective description might be "psychotically over-controlling," but safety first, right?

It's been -what?- 10 or 20 years now we've been hearing how Windoze was a virus-sink, vice the superior Apple systems. I can tell you I've only been bitten once, due to my own stupidity at 2 in the morning (extreme lack of sleep), which was easily fixed.

The good Scribe is perfectly accurate in pointing out that normal caution is the standard. Exercise said normal caution and you will be unlikely to encounter trouble.

That said, the more I hear about Android's Near Field Communcations (NFC) feature, the less I like it. I would if possible hack into the hardware to make it physically impossible to implement on my phone.

Just the other day I recieved a notice there was an available update for Google Maps. Sounds innocent, right? But the new (and {cough} improved) rights include full permissions to communicate with any and all NFC devices in range. No one explained WHY Maps needs this capability, and the idea of any app being allowed full NFC access from my phone gives me the creeps.

There's absolutely no risk in allowing other (unknown) NFC devices to communicate with your phone, especially Google Wallet, without your consent. None at all. I'm sure Google has worked very, very hard to ensure you are 100% secure.

I'm also sure DVD & Blu-Ray makers were sure their protection schemes were 100% secure as well.

I hate to say it (because they're more expensive) but NFC may force me to buy an Apple phone, because the whole concept is a walking cluster-hump of security risks.
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
My tablet has NFC, but I can turn it off. I imagine Gmaps might nag me about turning it back on, but that would be ... unfortunate.

And if NFC starts to get popular with users, don't think for a minute Apple won't jump onboard.
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
I use a plain-vanilla B&N nook for a tablet, and a 'stupid' phone to avoid these security concerns . . . maybe I'm just fooling myself?
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
Makes sense. The open architecture of Android coupled w/ an unmoderated app store/stores and huge market penetration makes for an irresistible target for hackers. Surprised iOS wasn't targeted much. Or maybe it was and the hackers mostly failed

Be careful out there kids.
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
It isn't that iOS isn't targeted, but Apple keeps a tight grip on all apps. You have to go through the Apple gatekeeper in order to be in the sole app store for iOS. Unlike Android where you can install 3rd party apps (that could be malware) from any source.

Technically there could be malware out there for iPhones/iPads that have been jailbroken, but that would be harder to confirm.
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
View All