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by
Rick Moran

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March 1, 2014 - 7:58 am
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Because of threats to ethnic Russians and the need to protect its naval personnel, Russian President Vladimir Putin asked and received permission from the Russian parliament to intervene in the Sudetenland Ukraine. The vote in the upper chamber was the final step in what appears to be a carefully orchestrated series of events that will give Putin broad latitude in dealing with Czechoslovakia/Poland Ukraine.

As justification, the Washington Post is reporting that the Russian government is claiming that “unidentified gunmen directed from Kiev” had  taken over a German radio station  tried to take over the Crimean Interior Ministry headquarters overnight.

The move comes after pro-German Poles the pro-Russian regional prime minister in Crimea had requested help from Russia to keep the peace.

Meanwhile, in Kiev, the new Ukraine government made it clear they would not fight to keep Crimea. But what about other provinces in the east and south with pro-Russian majorities?

Putin may have designs on them too.

“As a result of this treacherous provocation there were casualties,” the ministry said in a statement. “With decisive action, the attempt by vigilante groups to seize the Interior Ministry building was averted. This confirms the desire of prominent political circles in Kiev to destabilize the peninsula. We encourage those who give such orders from Kiev to show restraint. We believe it is irresponsible to continue whipping up the already tense situation in the Crimea.”

That account was disputed in Simferopol, the Crimean regional capital. Igor Aveytskiy, who was named by the Kiev government to serve as chief of Crimea’s national police, said in an interview that “all was peaceful” at the building overnight.

The story line was different in Moscow.

There, a council of the State Duma, the lower house of parliament, asked Putin to intervene.

“The deputies are calling on the president to take measures to stabilize the situation in Crimea,” Duma chairman Sergei Naryshkin said, “and use all resources available to protect the Crimean population from lawlessness and violence.”

Next came Valentina Matviyenko, chairman of the upper house, the Federation Council.

“Perhaps in this situation we could grant the Crimean government’s request,” she said, “and send a limited contingent there to provide security for the Black Sea Fleet and Russian citizens living in Crimea.”

Then Putin made his request, and 30 minutes later a Federation Council committee approved it.

Steven Pifer, a former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine who helped negotiate a 1994 memorandum on Ukrainian territorial sovereignty, and tweeted Saturday that there is “no doubt in my mind that Russia is violating its commitments.” He also called the Russian move a violation of a 1997 treaty between Ukraine and Russia.

According to Josh Rogin writing in the Daily Beast, technically, those mysterious armed men occupying the airports and parliament building aren’t Russian troops. They’re military contractors who perform security duties for the Russian government:

Private security contractors working for the Russian military are the unmarked troops who have now seized control over two airports in the Ukrainian province of Crimea, according to informed sources in the region. And those contractors could be setting the stage for ousted President Viktor Yanukovich to come to the breakaway region.

The new Ukrainian government in Kiev has accused Moscow of “an armed invasion and occupation” in the Crimean cities of Simferopol and Sevastopol, where well-armed and well-organized troops with no markings or identification have taken control of the airports. Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov told Secretary of State John Kerry over the phone Friday that no Russian military or marines have been deployed outside of the base of the Black Sea Fleet, which is anchored nearby, officials in both governments said.

Lavrov was technically telling the truth, but the troops are being directed by the Russian government. Although not confirmed, informed sources in Moscow are telling their American interlocutors that the troops belong to Vnevedomstvenaya Okhrana, the private security contracting bureau inside the Russian interior ministry that hires mercenaries to protect Russian Navy installations and assets in Crimea. Other diplomatic sources said that the troops at the airport were paramilitary troops but not specifically belonging to Vnevedomstvenaya Okhrana.

Now Putin will send in the real thing — Russian ground troops.

Comments are closed.

Top Rated Comments   
Uh. Mr. Flexibility understates the threat that Putin represents as much as absolutely possible, and the MSM ditto. Obama mocked Romney for calling Russia our greatest geopolitical foe, even though pound for pound, extending hegemony in the middle east (Syria in their pocket; open collaboration with Iran, a country that declared war on us some four decades ago), invading nearby states (See article above), and going to all possible lengths to get on the US's nerves (The Snowden affair), Russia has beat out China. The MSM mocked Sarah Palin when she predicted... *completely accurately* as we are learning... that Putin would invade Crimea if Obama was elected.

Furthermore, if you want to know what Putin is, ask the Russians. Just don't ask them while they're in Russia. Ex-KGB agent Putin has been assiduously attacking protesters and jailing dissenters in a style that very much earns the struck-out phrases in this post. The fact that he is even in power at the moment is troubling... a result of careful leverage of political power in order to hold onto that power long past his sell-by date. I don't need anything but observation to understand Putin craves control and represents a serious threat.

Here's a question for you: how did you FAIL to know these things? How do you achieve such a perfect pitch of ignorance that you would phrase a question in this way, as though you secretly suspect Putin is invading Crimea for humanitarian reasons but the Obama administration is covering it up? Did you just believe that, since Putin is against Obama, he must not be the bad guy? Putin is against Obama because Obama, *gag*, represents America. Same reason much of the middle East is against Obama. It's about hating America and what she stands for, and I would hope that your unconsidered response would not be to immediately support them on those grounds. This is a case of the enemy of my enemy being my enemy's enemy.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
OK – here’s an example of something that’s been bothering me for some time now:

“The Swedish foreign minister tweeted…”

I don’t mean to pick on the Swedes specifically, but when and why did it become proper that major policy statements and condemnations are delivered by tweet?

5,000 killed in a Syrian town? Susan Rice tweets “We condemn in the strongest…yadda, yadda, yadda…” China extends air defense shield over Japanese islands? John Kerry tweets “We condemn in the strongest…yadda, yadda, yadda…”

How frivolous this is! Is Putin supposed to pull back ground troops to avoid trending badly on Twitter?

“We condemn in the strongest terms as long as the strongest terms are less than 140 characters!”
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Joe Biden announces that the United States will be boycotting the Winter Olympics in Sochi this Summer as a Protest to this Action by Russia.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (29)
All Comments   (29)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
Ex post facto. The Russian Parliament is Putin's afterthought.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
The analogy breaks down on the simple fact that the Russian Army has a total of 285K troops most of which are not combat ready. Only Russia's elite airborne forces are battle worthy. Of that 285k only 150k are available to invade Ukraine. They will be opposed by about 75k Ukrainians who aren't any better trained but they are better motivated than the average Russian solider. Ukraine is just too big for the small Russian army to take on. They can grab the Crimea because they already have bases there. Beyond that It becomes quite a stretch to go after the entire country right now. It looks like the Ukrainian government will not contest the Russian invasion in the Crimea. I wouldn't bet on that policy continuing if the Russians try to go further.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
I expect some time in the next 5 or ten years (20 years in the outside) that Russia will take Eastern Ukraine. It is majority Russian. We will see ethnic cleansing on both sides.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
It often comes down to a matter of will.

Do the Ukrainians have the will to resist?

Does the West have the will to assist?

Putin is no doubt carefully watching the responses, much like previous tyrants have watched for weakness in their intended targets in the past.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
", much like previous tyrants have watched for weakness in their intended targets in the past."

That was the secret to Hitler's success. He was not an evil genius, but he knew how far he could push people.

Without the U.S. coming into the war and if Barbarosssa had not happen, the British would have been finished.

Even with Barabarossa Germany may have triumphed. The Yugoslavia change of government delayed Barbarossa for weeks. It was aided and abetted by the British. What if it had not happened? What would a few more weeks of good campaigning weather have done in the east?
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Agree with everything you said. The outcome of WWII, in so many places, seemed to hang on a knife edge.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Well, not to seem disagreeable but Russia has its navy and air force as well, which can do serious, significant damage and kill/maim thousands in a very short time.

Putin would use these to force Ukraine to submit.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Putin has been smart. He frames himself to much of the world as a counterweight to the US. On the other hand he frames himself to people like Pat Buchanan as pro Christian and pro life, I suspect cynically. But in the back of your mind is the possibility that he might invade your country or kill you if you do not give him what he wants. He has intentionally framed himself as a badass. Cowards like Obama defer. The Ukrainian students however called his bluff. We will now see if he is willing to pay the price of his badass pretentions.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
It's not 1939 revisited, and Putin is not 'aping Hitler'.
It is rather more like 1914, where states sleepwalked into war.
Let's not forget that without the previous violent events in Kiev, fuelled by the EU and the USA (check out Ms Nuland, her infamous phone call and her speech mentioning that the US had given 5 million $$ to Ukrainian 'protest' groups), this intervention wouldn't have been necessary.
Already forgotten that the new regime has repealed the law making Russian the second official language?
Already forgotten that there are some extremely unsavoury groups which can truly be called neo-nazis, which have members in the new regime?
Do check out "Right Sector" on youtube - their own video speaks volumes ...
There's one difference however to then - be it 1939 or 1914 - and now, and that is that the people are no longer fooled by the lofty words of the politicians or by the blatant propaganda of the MSM across the board, certainly not in Europe.
We know the blame rests with the EU and not Putin.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
I would say Crimea belongs to Russia,

Kruschev gave it to Ukraine in 1956. There are more Russians there than Ukranians

That said if Obama allows it to happen via force, more evil will result.

Obama is not making a choice. To not make a choice is still to make a choice. So Obama is allowing this evil to happen. Harsh words aside and maybe a few sanctions, Obama makes Neville Chamberlain look like a Man of Steel!
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Go away Russian troll.

Extremely unsavory groups in the Ukraine are an issue for the Republic of Ukraine.

Russian history of invading to save oppressed people is a long history of lies and excuses. Russia invades countries only to benefit itself, never in the unselfish interests of others.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
And American history of the last 20 years of "invading to save oppressed people" is a history of lies and disasters. America has also continuously pumped money and other aid recently into groups in Europe, the Middle East and elsewhere which do not believe in anything like the founding principles, or in Christianity. In fact, George Soros must be in a constant state of merriment to see how the USA has been helping his causes, while many Americans who think of "Soros" as a dirty word remain blissfully ignorant.

How do you like that, Neocon troll?
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Your response is incoherent.

I wasn't actually addressing you, but since your point is so logically incorrect, I will respond anyway.

U.S policy over the last 20 years, whether right or wrong, has no bearing on Russia’s tyrannical move in Ukraine. It would be like a thief claiming he is innocent, because the fellow down the block is a thief as well.

Second, although I am a Christian, and I probably agree with some of what you are implying regarding U.S. support of various groups or efforts, what the heck does that have to do with Russia potentially going to war with the country of Ukraine? Answer: nothing.

colliemum appears to be rationalizing Russia/Putin’s move into Ukraine. It’s all the EU’s fault, not Putin’s! Really?

I don’t know you, but I sense that your overall point is that the U.S. should stay out. If so, fine. But don’t make that point by taking the position that a man with blood on his hands, a man who is more than willing to risk a very dangerous war, is not at fault.

Russia invades countries only to benefit itself, never in the unselfish interests of others. This has not changed.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
My apologies, fortibus85, for getting heated, but the other commenter did not deserve the epithet of "troll." I do think that you and I share some views, but I also think that Russia deserves much more respect and sympathy than it is getting at PJMedia. Putin is no choirboy, but he also is no Lenin, Mao or Hitler, and he is acting, I think rationally, in the interests of Russia.

General US and EU policy over the last few decades are very much relevant to what is going on in Ukraine, all the way up to how the US and EU supported the mob that overthrew Yanukovych. The US and EU have acted against Russian interests frequently and significantly, at least since the 1990's when the US and EU continually acted against Serbia, and aided Islamists in the Balkans and the Caucasus. The US and EU also meddled very deeply in Ukraine affairs in the 90's, against Russian wishes, and this has continued up the current support of the Kiev "demonstrators" and mobs.

What is happening in Crimea is a very unsurprising and logical outcome from what has been going on recently in Ukraine, and in the context of Russia's relations with the "west."
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Egil,
Thanks. Points noted. Putin is not Mao, Lenin or Hitler, etc.. My thoughts are that the U.S. gets to have "interests" as well as the Russians. So, for example, if we have helped the opposition group in Ukraine, (and implying that we should not), are you also implying that Russia has _not_ helped the groups it likes? I haven't researched it, but I seriously doubt they have taken a "hands off" stance.

Anyway, time will tell. Thanks again.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Very well said, colliemum! American pundits have gotten into the bad habit lately of comparing every hard-headed move overseas to "Hitler taking Czechoslovakia!", and every bit of realistic diplomacy as "Chamberlain appeasing Hitler!" What nonsense. You would think that the disasters in Iraq and Afghanistan would open more eyes. The media though, and many commenters here, tend to still be brazenly ignorant about world events and history.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
after Benghazi, obama went to Vegas to fundraise.

after his Syria speech, he played golf.

after his Crimea speech, he went to a DNC fundraiser and declared "Happy Hour"

a fundamentally unserious man, in a serious job at a seriously dangerous time.

the world is in serious touble.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
So, the Obama administration and MSM are telling us that Putin and Russia are the bad guys.

I should believe the MSM because... why, again?

I should believe the Obama administration because...why, again?
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Uh. Mr. Flexibility understates the threat that Putin represents as much as absolutely possible, and the MSM ditto. Obama mocked Romney for calling Russia our greatest geopolitical foe, even though pound for pound, extending hegemony in the middle east (Syria in their pocket; open collaboration with Iran, a country that declared war on us some four decades ago), invading nearby states (See article above), and going to all possible lengths to get on the US's nerves (The Snowden affair), Russia has beat out China. The MSM mocked Sarah Palin when she predicted... *completely accurately* as we are learning... that Putin would invade Crimea if Obama was elected.

Furthermore, if you want to know what Putin is, ask the Russians. Just don't ask them while they're in Russia. Ex-KGB agent Putin has been assiduously attacking protesters and jailing dissenters in a style that very much earns the struck-out phrases in this post. The fact that he is even in power at the moment is troubling... a result of careful leverage of political power in order to hold onto that power long past his sell-by date. I don't need anything but observation to understand Putin craves control and represents a serious threat.

Here's a question for you: how did you FAIL to know these things? How do you achieve such a perfect pitch of ignorance that you would phrase a question in this way, as though you secretly suspect Putin is invading Crimea for humanitarian reasons but the Obama administration is covering it up? Did you just believe that, since Putin is against Obama, he must not be the bad guy? Putin is against Obama because Obama, *gag*, represents America. Same reason much of the middle East is against Obama. It's about hating America and what she stands for, and I would hope that your unconsidered response would not be to immediately support them on those grounds. This is a case of the enemy of my enemy being my enemy's enemy.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
I got to know several Russian families living in the U.S. I asked each of them what they thought of Putin. They all gave the same answer about like this. Well, I don't really like him but he is what Russia needs at this time.

The country is still on its back and not much of a threat to the U.S. Demographics do not look good for Russia's future. Whether or not they take Crimea has little effect on us even though it may be despicable. We can't get in the middle of every squabble in the world.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Putin is "against" Obama, America and western Europe because they have been acting overtly and covertly against Russia. The Cold War has been over a long time. Yet many of those who shrilly condemn Putin are more virulent than most anti-Communists were during the Cold War.

Putin is a dictator, but to his credit he at least understands both Russia and realpolitik better than most American politicians and pundits. Neocons and other leftists have had a devastating effect on US-Russian relations.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Sic the IRS unto Putin !

Let the ATF send assault rifles to the Ukrainians !

38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
OK – here’s an example of something that’s been bothering me for some time now:

“The Swedish foreign minister tweeted…”

I don’t mean to pick on the Swedes specifically, but when and why did it become proper that major policy statements and condemnations are delivered by tweet?

5,000 killed in a Syrian town? Susan Rice tweets “We condemn in the strongest…yadda, yadda, yadda…” China extends air defense shield over Japanese islands? John Kerry tweets “We condemn in the strongest…yadda, yadda, yadda…”

How frivolous this is! Is Putin supposed to pull back ground troops to avoid trending badly on Twitter?

“We condemn in the strongest terms as long as the strongest terms are less than 140 characters!”
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
When you think about it, tweeting is just another form of media release. I mean after all, newspapers are not instruments of the state. ( Well, uh, I mean they aren't supposed to be). The "official press conference" is simply a government official appearing before public media outlets. Tweeting is a way to get the same word out publicly, without use of reporters.

I agree it feels juvenile, tacky, less official, but I think it is here to stay.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Joe Biden announces that the United States will be boycotting the Winter Olympics in Sochi this Summer as a Protest to this Action by Russia.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
International crisis ?
Time for the CiC to go take a nap, it worked so good for Benghazi.

38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
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