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The PJ Tatler

by
Stephen Kruiser

Bio

December 3, 2013 - 12:58 pm

Surprise! But not.

Here is the all too predictable result of devoting a couple of generations to focusing on the feelings of the students and the retirement plans of the teachers. Read ‘em and weep for the future of America (click to enlarge):

oecd

Stephen Kruiser is a professional comedian and writer who has also been a conservative political activist for over two decades. A co-founder of the first Los Angeles Tea Party, Kruiser often speaks to grassroots groups around America and has had the great honor of traveling around the world entertaining U.S. troops.

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All Comments   (6)
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The results deserve more than a glance.

The charts are listed in order by math scores; actually, the US is above the OECD average in reading, though not significantly. But there other differences that are significant.

China did not participate as a country, nor did India.

And most important, demographics matter.

Steve Sailer summarizes:
So, Asian Americans outscored all large Asian countries (with the exception of three rich cities); white Americans outperformed most, but not all, traditionally white countries; and Latino Americans did better than all Latin American countries. African Americans almost certainly scored higher than any black majority country would have performed.
http://isteve.blogspot.com/2013/12/graph-of-2012-pisa-scores-for-65_4.html

Relevant bits from his table:
Mean of all three tests, reading, mathematics, science
587 Shanghai
556 Singapore
554 Hong Kong
548 Asian Americans
(and the next three are South Korea, Japan and Taipei)
(next countries are Finland 529, Estonia, Liechtenstein, Canada, Poland, Netherlands, to Switzerland 518)
518 White Americans
497 OECD average
492 US average
465 Hispanic Americans
434 African Americans
(The other two BRICs are Russia at 481, and Brazil at 402.)

The samples are supposed to be representative, but countries interpret the rules about exemptions in various creative ways. Sailer has a list of percentages "missing"
http://isteve.blogspot.com/2013/12/pisa-which-countries-not-to-trust.html

19 weeks ago
19 weeks ago Link To Comment
Thats because we don't spend enough for the Wash DC bureaucrats in the Dept of Ed to shuffle papers around not to mention the ones on state and local payrolls. Once Common Core gets in full swing were sure to fall even further, but at least the children won't be exposed to dangerous Jesus talk.
19 weeks ago
19 weeks ago Link To Comment
These are the results of the PISA test, which tests 15-year-olds. I don't know whether or not those tested represent a true cross section in each country.
19 weeks ago
19 weeks ago Link To Comment
Frequently, American 15 year-olds are behind other nations 12 year-olds.

And that holds even in different STATES.
19 weeks ago
19 weeks ago Link To Comment
I've seen this type of story before. Usually they compare all US students against only the foreign students who go to high school and not trade schools.
19 weeks ago
19 weeks ago Link To Comment
My self esteem has gone through the roof now that I know we will never again be able to exploit the rest of the world!
19 weeks ago
19 weeks ago Link To Comment
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