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Look Ma, No Hands

April 24th, 2014 - 7:37 pm

There is a conceit inherent in being professionally modest; in feigning a departure from the stage only to insist on pulling the strings from behind the props. Thus there is a certain underhandedness about leading from behind.  J. Berkshire Miller, writing in the National Interest, put his finger on the fatal hidden contradiction of the Obama foreign policy.  Obama wanted to relinquish the wheel while having the last say on everything. In particular, he affirmed the great power status of China, but forgot about Japan.  It was as if a traffic cop, having vacated the intersection, neglected to remember that collisions would be the outcome of switching off the signal lights.

Everyone wanted to move forward. When the Japanese prime minister visited the Yasukuni shrine as part of his campaign to re-introduce Japan unapologetically on the world stage, Obama was displeased because that would irk China. And when China reacted in the Senkakus, Obama was displeased because things weren’t going according to his plan. At no point did he see the cascade of events as started by the White House itself.

And this gradual widening between Abe and Obama also resulted in some failed messaging from Washington. One of the most acute examples of this was the U.S. acceptance of the term “great-power relationship” to reflect its ties with Beijing. The move, which came out of the Obama-Xi summit at Sunnylands, resulted in bewilderment in Japan, among other places in Asia, and has contributed to fears that the Obama administration may acquiesce to China’s salami-slicing tactics in the East China Sea. While the United States insists that its interpretation of the “great power relations” is different than that of Beijing, the perception in Tokyo remains that this was a critical mistake. These cracks were heightened once again when the United States and Japan appeared out of sync with regard to the compliance of their commercial airliners to China’s unilateral imposition of an Air Defense Identification Zone in the East China Sea last November.

It was perhaps for that reason that Obama, surveying the pile up at the intersection, sought to restore order again with a flashing yellow caution light pointing all ways by declaring the US bound by a treaty to defend the Senkaku islands. You might have thought he would learn something about drawing Red Lines, but hey, it’s Obama.

He’s got the idea the world will run itself, and according to his expectations too. The New York Times reported the administration has now set great store by traffic rules agreed between 20 nations in the Asia Pacific; like handing out a Driver’s Handbook in the Asia Pacific and leaving it at that.

A naval code of conduct approved by more than 20 nations around the Pacific, including China, Japan and the United States, could reduce the risk of accidental encounters’ spiraling into conflict, experts said. But Beijing’s firm rejection of President Obama’s comments on Wednesday about islands claimed by both China and Japan underscored the maritime tensions that continue to trouble Asia….

The Code for Unplanned Encounters at Sea was endorsed Tuesday by naval officials from the United States, China, Japan and other states at a symposium in the northeastern Chinese port city of Qingdao, China’s state-run Xinhua news agency reported.

The agreement comes at a time of growing concern about territorial disputes between China and some of its neighbors. China claims islands controlled by Japan in the East China Sea known as the Senkaku in Japan and the Diaoyu in China. Several countries, including China, Vietnam and the Philippines, have overlapping maritime claims.

Note the NYT reports China has already rejected Obama’s comments, but don’t expect him to notice.

The administration appears to believe there is some kind of natural international legal order which will enforce itself. Hillary Clinton, asked to comment on Russia’s dismemberment of the Ukraine ventured that Moscow would be punished by a kind of Karma. “I think the outcome for him and Russia will not be good, which is deeply unfortunate,” she said. “Russia should be a much more dynamic and much more successful country and could be if Putin weren’t trying to turn the clock back to the Soviet Union days.”

Senior administration officials make all these curious reference to the “clock” or the “21st century behavior”. Obama once reviled Romney by saying the “80′s wanted their foreign policy back” as if the decades could be reified.   When he wants to be more precise Obama invokes the hand of “international community” to explain whose chastisement will descend on the international malefactor.

But it is always some unspecified mystical force — never Washington itself — who will square the account. For example, you have the administration’s assurances that Putin will be punished for invading the Ukraine by some ineffable force, just as long as you remember that force won’t be the administration.

For a town that doesn’t believe much in God, Washington is more full of ghostly invocations than a whiskey preacher; as if the god of history were a palpable presence, standing at their right hand, waiting to clean up after them. They say this even though in Ukraine, for instance, Moscow said “that it would immediately start military maneuvers along the border with Ukraine”. That sounds like a threat to which Kerry could only retort by saying “the window to change course is closing.”

So now it’s the window what’s going to punish Putin.  At least it’s not the door. As for Kerry, not so much. Like some public policy adolescents the administrations gads about, scattering half forgotten initiatives like dirty socks and shirts secure in the belief that something — the Man maybe — will pick up the trash.  Possibly the most relevant commentary on Obama era foreign policy was the 420 counterculture celebration in San Francisco’s Golden Gate park.  These environmental advocates left 10,000 pounds of trash, brought traffic in the Haight to a standstill and started a fight in the process of being cool.  If you think the 420 guys have lost it, then what about Obama?

All you need is love. What do you need to pick up the trash for?

Eli Lake, writing in the Daily Beast, notes one of the forgotten threads of the Libyan adventure. “Jihadists Now Control Secretive U.S. Base in Libya”.

In the summer of 2012, American Green Berets began refurbishing a Libyan military base 27 kilometers west of Tripoli in order to hone the skills of Libya’s first Western-trained special operations counter-terrorism fighters. Less than two years later, that training camp is now being used by groups with direct links to al Qaeda to foment chaos in post-Qaddafi Libya. …

Last week, the Libyan press reported that the camp (named “27” for the kilometer marker on the road between Tripoli and Tunis) was now under the command of Ibrahim Ali Abu Bakr Tantoush, a veteran associate of Osama bin Laden who was first designated as part of al Qaeda’s support network in 2002 by the United States and the United Nations. The report said he was heading a group of Salifist fighters from the former Libyan base.

In other words, Tantoush is now the chief of a training camp the U.S. and Libyan governments had hoped would train Libyan special operations forces to catch militants like Tantoush. …

According to one U.S. official who is read into the training program, the camp today is considered a “denied area,” or a place where U.S. forces would have to fight their way in to gain access. Until now, the Western press has not reported that the base used to train Libyan special operations forces was seized by the militants those troops were supposed to find, fix and finish.

The fact that the one-time training base for Libyan counter-terrorism teams is now the domain of terrorists is a poignant reminder the United States has yet to win its war with al Qaeda, despite the successful 2011 raid that killed its founder and leader.

It’s a Middle Eastern example of Obama’s method of greenlighting everything and being in charge of nothing and then running like hell when there’s a 70 car pileup in the intersection. Whether the word you want to use is “recognizing the great power status of China” — without recognizing the great power status of Japan, or “leading from behind”, which in this case means letting al-Qaeda take weapons and bases from you like candy from a baby, the concept is the same: action by inaction. Achievement by expectation.

There’s a touching belief among some that the world can be made to run the way you want without taking the trouble to run it. But it takes talent to run a successful frat-house. Perhaps the last person to do it was Winston Churchill (whose bust Obama sent back) during the Second World War. Churchill created the Special Operations Executive, made up of talented amateurs whose mission was to “set Europe ablaze”.

Obama probably wanted to do something like that. And it was with childlike delight that he at first greeted the Arab Spring.  Look ma, I’m Winston Churchill. But what he forgot — which Churchill knew — was that the difference between setting an enemy-held continent ablaze and setting your pants on fire was competence and foresight. You needed talented amateurs, and alas Obama had the latter but lacked the former. Still the president had the pants and also the matches.


Did you know that you can purchase some of these books and pamphlets by Richard Fernandez and share them with you friends? They will receive a link in their email and it will automatically give them access to a Kindle reader on their smartphone, computer or even as a web-readable document.

The War of the Words for $3.99, Understanding the crisis of the early 21st century in terms of information corruption in the financial, security and political spheres
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No Way In at Amazon Kindle $8.95, print $9.99. Fiction. A flight into peril, flashbacks to underground action.
Storm Over the South China Sea $0.99, how China is restarting history in the Pacific
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Top Rated Comments   
The reason why the faculty lounge has become a joke is because of a well-known capacity among college faculty for self-delusion. It's hard to take the “progressive” credentials of a professor seriously when he kills every new idea he ever sees, when his nonconformity is merely the conformity of his youth, when his iconoclasm is the herd mentality of iconoclasts, and when he likes to think he is setting trends while his actual role is in stopping them.

There are reasons why a wise university administrator will couch every reform within the reactionary rhetoric of traditionalism rather than the rhetoric of trendiness. Trendiness and fashion are an appeal to authority while an appeal to tradition allows for a range of choices to those well versed in history.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
Conrad Black has a spirited defense of Mark Steyn in The American Spectator

http://spectator.org/articles/58774/gospel-according-mark-steyn

He does the one thing the Republicans have not, but for which Abraham Lincoln praised Gen. Grant, " 'I can't spare this man; he fights.'

At this point, Steyn took the tompions out of his heavy-gage guns and bombarded the serried ranks of be-robed sacred cows on the American bench. Apart from appealing the decision (unsuccessfully), he impugned the judge’s intelligence and pointed out factual errors in her judgment. It was a refreshingly robust response, doubly refreshing because of the free lunch the entire American judiciary has long enjoyed in the media and public opinion. While the president and Congress have been rightly chastised for their incompetence, and at times, their venality, the bench has soldiered unassailably on for decades, tacitly assumed by almost everyone to be condign and virtuous.

In fact, as is becoming notorious, American justice is in a shocking condition. Too many judges in the U.S. are elected; too many are ex-prosecutors; the battle over capital punishment has taken all the air out of the room in which the infamous severity of American sentences and the unspeakable lopsidedness of prosecutorial success should be debated. This is a country that inspired the world with a vision of freedom and democracy (though Great Britain, Switzerland, much of the Netherlands, and Scandinavia were just as democratic at the time of the American Revolution). Yet the entire legal apparatus has sat like a gigantic suet pudding and the Supreme Court, in between its four-month vacations, has drunk the Kool-Aid of its own bathwater. The Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendment guaranties of due process, just compensation for seizure of property, grand jury deliberations as assurance against capricious prosecution, prompt justice, access to counsel (of choice), impartial jury, and reasonable bail have been put to the shredder. The United States has six to twelve times the number of incarcerated people per capita as Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, and the United Kingdom, the nearest comparable countries. Even after removing from the totals all those with unstigmatizing records irrelevant to their hireability today (DUI or disorderly conduct decades ago, for example), about 15 percent of adult males are felons.


In the same spirit of resistance, here is a question for all you lawyers, adherents of stare decisis, to answer.

Given that the new IPCC report acknowledges that water vapour is the major contributing gas to the greenhouse effect (contrary to Justice John Paul Stevens' majority opinion in Massachusetts v. EPA stating the carbon dioxide in the "primary species of greenhouse gas") but it is not responsible for global warming because it is only a "feedback" whereas carbon dioxide is a "forcing" that causes the sun to evaporate more water, wouldn't increased carbon dioxide necessarily increase the average global concentration of atmospheric water vapour?

What does SCOTUS have to tell us about that?

Or does a decreased concentration of water vapour in the atmosphere, due to the precipitation of snow onto CONUS, result in a lessened greenhouse effect and a "polar vortex"? Which came first, the snow or the polar vortex?

P.S. I'm sorry, but I just couldn't resist and let all the other bullies have all the fun in the Game of Kick Little Barry!
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
The difference between confidence and arrogance is competence...(me, circa 2010)
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (53)
All Comments   (53)
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Saying it with pictures, so the Aviators here can get it.
http://tinyurl.com/k9tjzzh
H/T Theo Spark
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
RWE3:

“...the disapproval of the Denizens of DC, the distain of the faculty lounge, coupled with the ignorance of the MSM, in the end won’t achieve anything.”

The power of the Wizard of Oz doesn't comes from the wizard himself, but is rather a reflection of a desire of others to live as children. The fashion industry exists because people with more dollars than sense want to be told what is fashionable by an authority figure (which is what a fashion magazine is).

Planned obsolescence is, at heart, a con game. Being a custodian of fashion is lucrative, but it requires a level of professionalism that rarely exists in government and academe. If a new editor sought a “fundamental transformation of Vogue”, chances are that most of Vogue's readership would go elsewhere. Sloppiness spoils the magic.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
The reason why the faculty lounge has become a joke is because of a well-known capacity among college faculty for self-delusion. It's hard to take the “progressive” credentials of a professor seriously when he kills every new idea he ever sees, when his nonconformity is merely the conformity of his youth, when his iconoclasm is the herd mentality of iconoclasts, and when he likes to think he is setting trends while his actual role is in stopping them.

There are reasons why a wise university administrator will couch every reform within the reactionary rhetoric of traditionalism rather than the rhetoric of trendiness. Trendiness and fashion are an appeal to authority while an appeal to tradition allows for a range of choices to those well versed in history.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
"Pastor"
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
I might also be a good time to note that it was Gen. U. S. Grant (R-IL) who led the American army against the CSA army, composed of white southern slaveholders, of a kind similar to Obama's mother's ancestors, to victory, thereby paving the way for black southerners, such as Michelle Obama's ancestors to migrate north to freedom in Illinois.

One can excuse Michelle Obama for having not previously been proud of her country, if one assumes her "country" was the CSA.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
Let's (note to uddy, Let us = let's) check out Obama's itinerary.

Japan - U S Navy helps control the Fukushima nuclear accident, Operation Tomodachi http://www.c7f.navy.mil/news/2011/03-march/040.htm & http://www.c7f.navy.mil/news/2011/03-march/069.htm
Korea - U S Navy helps with diving operations to recover students' bodies from capsized ferry
Philippines - U S Navy helps during super typhoon Haiyan
Malaysia - U S Navy helps in search for missing MH370 with both the Blue Fin 21 towed pinger locator and the P-8 Poseidon search aircraft.

ANYBODY THINK THE 7th FLEET DESERVES THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE?
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
A basic flaw in the foreign policy of O'Bama and his communist fellows is the refusal to even recognize islam as a corrosive force in today's world. O'Bama can cavalierly dismiss 2009 Fort Hood as "workplace violence," but neither Russia nor China can be so careless. Muslims are a daily threat within both Russia and China. When Putin talks about defending Russians within Ukraine he is talking about non-muslims in an area conquered from muslim enemies 200 years ago.

The muslim factor has been an element of Russian domestic policy since the Soviet era. Now that the Central Asian SSR's are independent "-istans" with potentially destructive influence on adjoining areas of Russia, the Russian domestic policy manifested by Chechnya is by definition foreign policy. The West, and now O'Bama in spades, has failed to give any significance to this thorny problem for Putin. Clinton blundered into the Balkans in ignorance of Russian interest in defending cultural allies against islam. O'Bama seems desirous of avoiding a repeat in Ukraine by simply staying out, although it is doubtful he and his team have really thought it through or even understand that aspect. They seem content to make the US look foolish and inept.

O'Bama is weaving fantasies and playing with his doll house. Given his incompetence (or anti-American malevolence) perhaps it is better that way.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
Far be it from me to say anything exculpatory about Barry Soetero, that lazy incompetent anti-American tool of the Fascist Democrats and their super-rich supporters, but ... maybe he recently learned that the Emperor has No Clothes:

http://turnerradionetwork.com/news/445-pat

"April 22, 2014 -- (TRN) -- Russia is claiming its newest aircraft combat electronics system rendered a U.S. Destroyer "helpless" in a recent encounter in the Black Sea. On April 10, the USS Donald Cook was repeatedly "buzzed" by a Russian SU-24 Fighter and according to the Russian News Service Ria Novasti, the ship was incapable of obtaining radar lock with its Aegis fire-control radar due to new Russian jamming abilities. As the Fighter aircraft "buzzed" the ship -- twelve separate times -- the Aegis system completely failed to operate, leaving the ship and crew totally vulnerable to the Russian warplane."

Could be total & utter bs, of course. But if Russia really might have some electronic tricks up their sleeves, the risk of any military engagement just went up exponentially. Not just for the US, but also for any country that has bought weapon systems from the US.

Of course, Barry still has those nuclear weapons -- the ones that have not been tested in a quarter of a century. Quelle domage, as Marie-Claire might say.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
quel dommage (un dommage is masculine)

Fortunately in this Gross Malheur, the French created their own computing system for their jet-fighters and war ships, that aren't compatible with the US arms, therefore they can't be deciphered from the enemis of our "friends", it's also why Rafale won the India Bid last year, because India's potential enemis have american arms, ie Pakistan

Sure that the russian fighter aircraft was picking some informations while flying around, in case of a escalade they will adapt their anti-missile and aircraft systems

But we still aren't there, only words, never the US delivered a war against Russia, and though there have had many opportunities for it

12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
Marie-Claude -- please accept my sincere apologies for getting your name wrong. Not intentional! Merely another sign of the progressive degradation of mental faculties which hits most males after the age of 18. It affects our recall of schoolboy French too, apparently.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
Very unlikely Aegis ever tried to actually achieve a "lock" which is in itself considered a hostile act. Destroyer's ROE in this scenario almost certainly meant it could only react to a hostile act from fighter, if no weapons launch via missile warning received prior to aircraft entering visual range of destroyer, then Aegis would not be used in a fire control mode. Once aircraft reached visual range of destroyer, and Cook's crew able to verify it was unarmed (which it was "wings clean"), then only thing left for Cook to do was enjoy an impromptu airshow. Admittedly, this left them open to above type propaganda, but there you go on a world where US firepower "leads from behind."
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
Bleaching out a phased array at close quarters is no trick. I would pay a nickle to see what was happening with the Phalanx system though. Ivan is barking at the wrong cat.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
Hasn't it been much more than a quarter of a century?
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
"Underground tests in the United States continued until 1992 (its last nuclear test), the Soviet Union until 1990, the United Kingdom until 1991, and both China ..."

Wow, I did not know that.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
Poetic Justice. The crowd that ridiculed Reagan for believing in Star Wars believes in The Force.

Regarding the incendiary sartorial subthread, Obama does not wear trousers or pants. He is a sexually ambiguous Slacker. He wears mom jeans or slacks.

Agreed that the "Code for Unplanned Encounters at Sea" is something that can be potentially useful for maximizing the efficient carrying capacity of the se lanes under conditions of good will but it will prove useless or worse in deterring aggression or intentional confrontations. By reducing the probability that deliberate misconduct will meet an effective response it enables aggression. Instead of assuring the world that challenges to free navigation will be met by an armed response it means that a process will be enabled and layers of well paid lawyers and process managers, paid for by eliminating the Navy that keeps the peace, will delay or prevent any response.

The US and the Soviets did have an agreement to manage our at sea encounters. It was based on adherence to the Rules of the Road, called the COLREGS for International Regulations for the Prevention of Collisions at Sea, and sober professional respectful realism that governed relations between two acknowledged enemies. No fantasies or wish fulfillments were involved.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
There was also a special signals book for communications between US and Soviet Naval vessels.
There were also special rules...
I remember clearly, pre-agreement, (It was an agreement between navies, not a treaty) we played electronic lock-on games and even rotated weapons mounts. After agreement all those clearly provocative actions were avoided. I remember a particularly funny trick I played...oops.
ta
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
What did you do, hand out little red lasers to the crew?

http://www.standard.net/sites/default/files/imagecache/max_800/stories/2014/01/30/199005-249783.jpg

The USS Zumwalt will be getting a BIG laser weapon http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UlLsnlPvP64
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
Simply blistering.

Takes knee, raises the three finger salute; sir, I commend you.

You are my Churchill.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
A little OT: hint to university: the entire US is a ''free-speech zone''--

dailycaller.com/2014/04/24/another-university-stops-students-from-handing-out-constitution/

AKA stupidity on stilts
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
Yes, and it sure sure would be nice if there was a political party in the US that would say all that out loud, tell the public what is happening, and jam the Constitution down the throat of the leftist traitors running the US university system until they choke.

Alas, we only have the republicans, who don't care too much about what that old-timey document from way-back says.

For example, Jeb Bush, who loves common core, which had an exercise inviting students to pick two amendments to drop from the Bill of Rights.

Obscure Simpsons reference, from circa 1990: THE Jeb Bush THE.

12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
Conrad Black has a spirited defense of Mark Steyn in The American Spectator

http://spectator.org/articles/58774/gospel-according-mark-steyn

He does the one thing the Republicans have not, but for which Abraham Lincoln praised Gen. Grant, " 'I can't spare this man; he fights.'

At this point, Steyn took the tompions out of his heavy-gage guns and bombarded the serried ranks of be-robed sacred cows on the American bench. Apart from appealing the decision (unsuccessfully), he impugned the judge’s intelligence and pointed out factual errors in her judgment. It was a refreshingly robust response, doubly refreshing because of the free lunch the entire American judiciary has long enjoyed in the media and public opinion. While the president and Congress have been rightly chastised for their incompetence, and at times, their venality, the bench has soldiered unassailably on for decades, tacitly assumed by almost everyone to be condign and virtuous.

In fact, as is becoming notorious, American justice is in a shocking condition. Too many judges in the U.S. are elected; too many are ex-prosecutors; the battle over capital punishment has taken all the air out of the room in which the infamous severity of American sentences and the unspeakable lopsidedness of prosecutorial success should be debated. This is a country that inspired the world with a vision of freedom and democracy (though Great Britain, Switzerland, much of the Netherlands, and Scandinavia were just as democratic at the time of the American Revolution). Yet the entire legal apparatus has sat like a gigantic suet pudding and the Supreme Court, in between its four-month vacations, has drunk the Kool-Aid of its own bathwater. The Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendment guaranties of due process, just compensation for seizure of property, grand jury deliberations as assurance against capricious prosecution, prompt justice, access to counsel (of choice), impartial jury, and reasonable bail have been put to the shredder. The United States has six to twelve times the number of incarcerated people per capita as Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, and the United Kingdom, the nearest comparable countries. Even after removing from the totals all those with unstigmatizing records irrelevant to their hireability today (DUI or disorderly conduct decades ago, for example), about 15 percent of adult males are felons.


In the same spirit of resistance, here is a question for all you lawyers, adherents of stare decisis, to answer.

Given that the new IPCC report acknowledges that water vapour is the major contributing gas to the greenhouse effect (contrary to Justice John Paul Stevens' majority opinion in Massachusetts v. EPA stating the carbon dioxide in the "primary species of greenhouse gas") but it is not responsible for global warming because it is only a "feedback" whereas carbon dioxide is a "forcing" that causes the sun to evaporate more water, wouldn't increased carbon dioxide necessarily increase the average global concentration of atmospheric water vapour?

What does SCOTUS have to tell us about that?

Or does a decreased concentration of water vapour in the atmosphere, due to the precipitation of snow onto CONUS, result in a lessened greenhouse effect and a "polar vortex"? Which came first, the snow or the polar vortex?

P.S. I'm sorry, but I just couldn't resist and let all the other bullies have all the fun in the Game of Kick Little Barry!
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
The man really believes that the US is what's wrong with the world. If we simply withdraw, the natural rationality and benevolence of the international community will reign. The UN will be exalted and conflict will cease if the US simply ends its unjust tyranny over the rest of the world. The moral leader who brings about this transformation will inevitably win his second Nobel peace prize and dominate the history of his era. What could go wrong?
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
I'm sure you write ironically, recalling the blazing impotence of the League of Nations... which should have been named the League of Gutless Pukes.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
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