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5 Uncomfortable Truths HBO’s Girls Reveals About American Pop Culture Today

Modern feminism has returned us to the chains of ancient pagan culture.

by
Susan L.M. Goldberg

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February 9, 2014 - 12:00 pm
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Editor’s Note: This article was first published in August of 2013. It is being republished as part of a new weekend series at PJ Lifestyle collecting and organizing the top 50 best lists of 2013. Where will this great piece end up on the list? Reader feedback will be factored in when the PJ Lifestyle Top 50 List Collection is completed in a few months…

girls

Sometimes what the media doesn’t want you to notice can hurt you. I grew up with Silent Generation parents who held some fairly strong Victorian values, so I heard plenty about the shameful evils of modern media before I entered college to study communications. There I learned the perspective of many critics and behind-the-scenes media makers: “The masses are asses.” While “shameful” has become a subjective quality in our postmodern era, the fact is that the folks bringing you your media think you’re downright dumb, no matter what.

They’re also motivated to do more than entertain you; today’s artists who garner attention are those that encourage you to “think” …just like them and their promoters. This, in essence, is the dark side of Girls. At 26, Lena Dunham stands the chance of becoming the next Orson Welles — a young individual with talent, ability and the right connections to make waves in the media. That is, if she weren’t so damned educated. And before you jump on the “evil liberal universities” bandwagon, be warned: the uncomfortable truth is that you, too, have been brainwashed.

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Susan:

Glad to see you're wise to the messed-up perspective of feminism.

I think it's amazing how similar to male chauvinism feminism seems to be: Feminism agrees with the male chauvinist that, from every form of difference between the sexes, it must necessarily follow that one side is inferior and the other superior. Warfare is assumed; the notion that the two are intended, through complementarity, to form a single whole never seems to cross the feminist mind.

It's interesting to me that you cite the difference of the Judeo-Christian tradition. Let me ask: How much have you studied "Theology of the Body?"

I realize TOB is usually cited on Internet forums on the topic of contraception; but that's because the culturally contentious 2% of anything in Judeo-Christian moral theology tends to suck the oxygen from the room! Set that aside for the moment, if you will. It's such a small segment of Theology of the Body.

It seems to me that TOB would offer a useful and complementary perspective on the kinds of topics you're discussing in this piece. It teaches the temporality of the human body and the immortality of the soul, without lurching into the gnostic error of thinking of the disembodied soul as "the real person" and the body as without value or negative. ("Male and female created He them...it was very good.")

And there's a lot in there about the intrinsic and invaluable dignity of women as women instead of as imitation men, while avoiding that sort of compulsory shoving of persons into arbitrary roles that you might expect of a Vive la difference perspective.

Really good stuff. JPII was a pretty good philosopher of the personalist school, with a lot to draw on. You ought to look into it, if you haven't.
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