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David Solway

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January 19, 2014 - 11:00 am
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I learned recently that Carleton University in the nation’s capital, Ottawa, following in the footsteps of other Canadian universities, has set aside a designated and enlarged prayer space, intended mainly for Muslim students who, as the Ottawa Citizen reports, “pray five times a day and for years have suggested that they need more room.” Otherwise, as president of the Muslim Student Association Mohamed Abdalla informs us, students end up praying in stairwells or libraries. That would clog up the works p.d.q., especially when convened five times a day.

Such accommodation, however, has no place in the public mandate of the academy’s parietal affairs, and Muslim students who proceed to foreground their faith in this disruptive manner should perhaps consider attending a Muslim university, or no university at all. The easing of the prayer crunch by constructing or expanding a designated venue, accepted by the author of the Citizen puff job as a prudent expedient, should not disguise the fact that public prayer (and in particular numerous prayer sessions punctuating the scholarly habitat) has no place in the Western university whatsoever.

I do not believe that Muslim students need more room. I believe that they need less mollycoddling and fewer concessions made in the name of their religious convictions. The university is a secular institution operating under an implicit code of academic conduct, which stipulates, inter alia, that classes be attended, that academic work proceed under rules of normative and respectable behavior, that examinations be held and properly invigilated, that modes of dress not be offensive, and that religious observances not interfere with a course of study. Allowing students to march five times a day to a prayer room in the midst of pursuing a concentrated program of academic activity, whether in the middle of a class or in the middle of a test or in the middle of a joint research project, does not seem an optimum means of following a university curriculum.

Of course, one need not stop at prayer rooms. Recently, the University of Regina has accommodated its Muslim students by installing specialized sinks for pre-prayer washing of feet, at the cost of $35,000. The entire tone of the Saskatchewan News article reporting on this glorious event is complaisantly favorable; after all, as journalist Aaron Stuckel educates us, “All Muslims have to purify themselves before they can pray to their god, Allah”—and the temporal Western university is, on this view, just the right place for foot baths to assist a sacralised washing ritual at multiple intervals during the academic day.

A controversy has recently erupted over a species of abject propitiation at York University that illustrated the academy’s dilemma over competing rights. A male student, whose name is being withheld, had asked to be excused from attending a class where female students form the majority, because the presence of women interfered, as Martin Singer, dean of the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies deposed, with his “firm religious values.” The professor in question, J. Paul Grayson of the Department of Sociology, rejected his request on the principle of gender equity. The administration, however, sided with the student and admonished the professor for refusing to “accommodate” the defector, on the principle of religious freedom. Singer afterward glossed the episode by declaring he was bound by the Ontario Human Rights Code, a fancy title for the sanctimonious folly of cultural, ethnic and religious appeasement that is denaturing the province and the country.

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All Comments   (14)
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Another excellent article by David Solway, who encapsulates in his scintillating prose the depth of the crisis facing the western democracies today. Where would we be without the Sage of Hudson?
30 weeks ago
30 weeks ago Link To Comment
Same pressures in Europe, one example, despite France's ban on public prayer, Muslims jam pack and block the streets with gigantic pray ins.

Pam Geller on the Islamization of America in 2013

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Peace/2014/01/09/The-Islamization-of-America-in-2013

30 weeks ago
30 weeks ago Link To Comment
A very few years after 9/11, my young family were traveling on vacation and stopped at Sideling Hill on the way. We would have loved going to the interpretive center---the mountain had basically been cut down the middle---except for my revulsion at a muslim family doing prayers centerstage at the stop.

These triumphalist behaviors are no accident and I keep wondering when somebody is going to call them out on it. Scratch that. I quit wondering.
They're eating us alive.
30 weeks ago
30 weeks ago Link To Comment
Yes, that's the way it is with Muslims. They are trained from birth, by Islam, to take over the public space. I lived in Jerusalem for a few years - the imams' prayers and sermons, often quite aggressive, hit you five times a day, including very early morning, in full volume using loud speakers. And the cowardly politicians here, in the name of religious freedom, allow them to keep using loud speakers beyond what is permissible by law.

Fight this slow conquest or you will find yourselves second or third rate citizens in a Muslim society. You have been warned.
30 weeks ago
30 weeks ago Link To Comment
"Such acts of gutless submissiveness on the part of the authorities..." Do you really expect anything other than this from institutions that gave up their 'authority' to student protestors in the 1960s and '70s? Many of these places of 'higher learning' are now overseen by those former protestors.

The only way these practices will ever be changed is if there is a reaction of some proportion to the them. To write or talk about them is of little worth, if no action is never taken to remedy them.

This is what happens when a nation opens its doors to diverse (different) peoples and cultures. From 'e pluribus unum' to 'e pluribus chaos.'
30 weeks ago
30 weeks ago Link To Comment
Doesn't seem so terrible to me. Seems like all they want is some sort of space to say the daily prayers. Well pray all you wish, no harm in that.

The solution is to have a designated chapel room open to all faiths.

I have worked in hospitals all my adult life. Every one has some sort of chapel room open to anyone and a chaplain who will help any faith so much as they can. There have been times when I have been there. In one case I showed up very rattled from a near miss accident and the Catholic priest had no Jewish prayer book. I asked if he had a bible with the book of Psalms. That worked. After a little while I was able to regain and go do my job.

I am all in favor of universities at least trying to accommodate students of religious faith in their observance. Too long we have let the university become the secular antithesis of religion.

How far a public institution should go to allow for religious expression is never cut and dry.

Saw an article somewhere recently about kosher meals in prisons. Most states will provide this. Apparently it has become a trend for some prisoners, of questionable bona fides, to request the Kosher meals because they feel they are of better quality. The meals cost more so what is the prison to do? They also provide halal meals in many prisons. Not so easy. Sure they can call in the Jewish or Muslim chaplains to talk with the prisoner but few rabbis or imams are going to deny anyone.

We are not France. In America we give much more latitude about religious expression.

Few months ago while waiting for a plane from Chicago to Atlanta, an orthodox Jewish man waiting for the same plane put on his Talis and Tefillin and said his morning prayers facing the rising sun.

I am Jewish, and not so devout. To me it was a comforting and welcome thing that in our country he could do this. He must have had a good word in with the almighty, because in a rare occurrence, a Delta flight actually departed and arrived on time.

I did wonder if some of the other passengers felt the same way. Were some of them uncomfortable about this man, with beard, those strange boxes on his head and arm, striped prayer shawl, silently mumbling words in an ancient language...all familiar and comforting to me but must seem odd and intrusive to some as we fiddled through our iPhones, Starbucks, and laptops.

What if he were Muslim and had laid out his rug to say his morning devotions? I should not have a problem with that. Hey, we are getting on a plane. Pray to whomever you wish. More the better. G-d hears all of us in any language.


30 weeks ago
30 weeks ago Link To Comment
spindoc, It's a slippery slope. Would you be ok with muslims gathering in the hundreds to block traffic on the busiest street during rush hour to say prayers when there is a mosque nearby as has actually happened? Would you be ok with muslims creating neighborhoods where the police are forbidden to enter and where non-muslim women are harassed and raped routinely should they walk down those streets as occurs in some parts of Europe today? There is a difference between your tolerance of them and their intolerance of you. Islam is not just a religion but a political force bent on destroying all other religions, all other ways of living including yours and mine. When they are weak and few in number they are polite but when they think they can intimidate and dominate they do so. There is sadly no common ground upon which to build a relationship of mutual respect between practicing muslims and non-muslims, i.e. infidels.
30 weeks ago
30 weeks ago Link To Comment
I agree that providing an open chapel room in a hospital is something we can all praise. (The issue in Canada -- in certain high schools -- is not about accommodating various faiths; it seems far more about appeasing certain Muslim groups. These groups (certainly not all Muslims) wish to assert their ascendency, their "specialness", their superiority and dominance, at the expense of others. thus their demands are only to the benefit of other like-minded Muslims. Should a public school discriminate against girls -- segregate them and have them sit at the back of a classroom? Is that acceptable?)
30 weeks ago
30 weeks ago Link To Comment
Thank you for another brilliant essay, Mr. Solway.

An ethos has developed in western nations which places religious beliefs beyond scrutiny and criticism. I think this is wrong and dangerous. Although everyone should be free to practice their religion what happens when religious beliefs conflict with fundamental values such as gender equality? I believe religious beliefs should not be above criticism. In fact because religious beliefs often influence conduct more than other beliefs, they should be subject to a special scrutiny.
30 weeks ago
30 weeks ago Link To Comment
Howdy TerryG
The ethos you describe only places Islam beyond scrutiny and criticism. Maybe Hinduism. The Christian and Jewish faiths are open to scorn and shunning.
30 weeks ago
30 weeks ago Link To Comment
Are these the same institutions that would close Christian student centers and send them off campus?
30 weeks ago
30 weeks ago Link To Comment
I believe that a university in Chicago turned the campus chapel into a prayer room for the Muslims, tearing out the pews and such. Why do those in power give in to such religious preference? If they don't like their ability to practice their religion they should go back to their country of origin and practice it in a Muslim country to get the real feel of the religion of peace. I for one am very tired of having my Christianity trampled while they cow tow down to Islam.
30 weeks ago
30 weeks ago Link To Comment
Rush to dhimmitude.
30 weeks ago
30 weeks ago Link To Comment
"Indeed, only adherents of a supremacist doctrine would insist that the university bend to their demands."

I sincerely doubt that the university would bend to the demands of someone who's a member of the odious Christian Identity church (basically white supremacists.)

And that Aikido (p.s. Aikido, not akido, you're missing an "i") "student" would not last in the dojo I attend. You work with everyone or no one. And you bow to all -- high and low as we are all equal as students.
30 weeks ago
30 weeks ago Link To Comment
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