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We All Wondered What Happened

The death of a local musician sparks memories for those who knew him -- and someone who didn't.

by
Kathy Shaidle

Bio

November 28, 2013 - 7:00 am
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It took me an embarrassingly long time to realize, somewhere around age 25, that the part I liked best about going out drinking was the “coming home” part.

I’d be in a cab going back to my apartment after downing ten bucks’ worth of 80 cent drafts at some “ladies entrance”-type “hotel” out on the then-ungentrified stretch of Queen West.

The blessedly silent driver would have on some jazz station I could never, ever find on my own radio dial when I tried.

As the car swept through puddles, I savored the simple, best-of-both-worlds sensation of “going somewhere” at deliberate speed without actually having to exert myself.

It was dark. I could see semi-cool stuff out the window — the somewhat glamorous, slightly menacing city at night — but none of it could see (or touch) me.

How much cheaper and easier it was, I discovered, to just stay home alone on Saturday night, listening to music I already knew I liked.

No lousy service or sight lines. Toilet paper in the bathroom!

The beer was cheaper, the weather didn’t matter, and transportation no longer a hassle.

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All Comments   (18)
All Comments   (18)
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Ah, yes, the 80s. I was living in Austin at that time, great music scene by the way, and I came out of a club and saw this guy passed out by the curb. He looked oddly familiar. Is that Ace Frehley? Then this limo drove up, picked him up off the street, and drove away. Wow, that was strange.

I've never heard of this band. But a couple of years ago, I was back in Austin, reliving my wayward youth during SxSW, and there was this unknown band playing the meanest rhythm and blues at a club. They were from Canada.

Go figure. I hadn't heard anyone play R&B like that since Stevie Ray Vaughn stalked the streets. I tipped them $20.

I used to see Stevie Ray play every week at the Steamboat Springs. Shook his hand on his birthday in 1983. Went to his comeback concert at the Austin Coliseum, after he was done with David Bowie. That man could play Hendrix like no one but Hendrix could. His brother played guitar for the Fabulous Thunderbirds. I used to see them weekly too.

In fact, my friend Ray lived next door to the bass player for the B-52s. We would eat barbeque with them on Sundays in the backyard, and then go see them at the Backyard. Next thing you know, they're on MTV. Rock Lobster!

Ah, yes, the 80s. I saw a lot of great bands in that decade, including the Grateful Dead. But the music from the 70s was much better and more defining. The bands you listen to when you're sixteen stay with you for the rest of your life. My bands then where Black Sabbath, Kiss, and AC/DC. Doesn't mean I didn't listen to the Beatles and the Rolling Stones.

I've seen a lot of great bands play in Austin,
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Wow Stevie Ray Vaughn every week! that's amazing. The Austin scene is legendary :-) Wish I knew which Canadian band you meant... Our "blues" artists tend to be technically impressive but, well, terminally "white" and when they open their mouths it just doesn't "work" for me.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Story reminds me of my college days in the early 80's while listening to the Suburbs (Minneapolis band) and thinking how unfair it is that they haven't made it to the big leagues. Strange world we live in - talent and a good product doesn't necessarily mean success.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Kind of reminded me of the "Psychedelic Furs".
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
What a waste of ................... time.

I want those 4 minutes back you fool.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
This piece sounds like something that should be read in a subdued voice by the author on NPR.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
I've had my moderately "rough days" as a youth, but overall I mostly sat on the sidelines of the party scene as a silent observer of the kinds of stupidity which get passed off as "all in good fun". I don't miss the very rare moments of past overindulgence, or the almost manic attemps to be "popular" with an in crowd. I settled into "judgemental curmudgeon" at a pretty young age.

What I have seen as I've gotten older is that all that "fun" does come at a price. Sometimes that price is death, sometimes it comes in broken relationships and damaged families. Other times it shows as unrealized ambitions and failed dreams.

As someone with a stable comfortable and mostly enjoyable life now, I think I made some pretty wise choices as a youth about what limits my pursuit of "fun" should keep. I allowed my abition to succeed choose more than my ambition to "fit in" with others. I remain an amiable curmudgeon iconoclast, but I've grown comforable with it.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
I stopped enjoying the bars when I turned 21. The challenge ended.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Poignant article but, as they say, apparently we have different tastes in music.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Liked the video...but then, I've always loved that type of music. Tried to find 'em on Amazon but they have nothing. I'd buy the album/cd/mp3 if it was available.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Try eBay, too. There's a near-mint LP of "Glow" listed there for $30.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
There's a used vinyl copy of "Glow" at Amazon.com.

You might want to ask someone over at the group's Facebook page if they could make you a tape or CD.

https://www.facebook.com/plasterscenereplicas
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Enjoyed reading your regrets about an un-misspent youth; those Bacchanals I similarly avoided. I do wonder about those times and not reaping any wild oats. This is tempered by the knowledge that rear view mirrors distort mercilessly, and at the time the young man I was saw some danger or pointlessness in such activity, and the drunken fun I witnessed as the sole sober one was often in reality a stupid, mean, violent and often vomitous grotesquery which laid low some of its players. They never finished college or got into the fields they'd aimed for, having chosen drink over grades. I'd bet then I couldn't do both booze and Biology 201 very well. I may have been wrong, but there you go.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
You are so right. I have a selective memory, plus envy is probably my most troublesome cardinal sin. Comparing yourself to other people is never a great idea! Some of those people 'having more fun' than me are dead, broke, old before their time, lonely etc.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
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