Get PJ Media on your Apple

PJM Lifestyle

Are Elite Colleges and Universities Discriminating Against Homeschoolers?

They should evaluate all students on a level playing field.

by
Paula Bolyard

Bio

August 26, 2013 - 9:00 am
Page 1 of 7  Next ->   View as Single Page

Studyfigure2

Homeschooling has been around long enough for the data to demonstrate that its graduates can and do succeed in college. Students coming from homeschool backgrounds enter college with significantly higher test scores than their public (and even private) school peers. They graduate from college at a higher rate­—66.7 percent compared to 57.5 percent—and earn higher grade point averages while in school, according to one study.

Though at one time college enrollment for homeschoolers was very complicated and not always successful, many colleges and universities now include a section on their websites explaining the admissions procedures for students educated at home and many roll out the welcome mat with admissions policies tailored to their unique needs and educational experiences.

Princeton is an example of a school that takes a realistic view of homeschooling and views its applicants as more than a test score or high school transcript:

We recognize that your experience as a home schooled student will be somewhat different from students in traditional schools. We’ll look at your academic record and non-academic interests and commitments within the context of your particular home school curriculum and experience.

Princeton notes that there are questions on the application that may not apply to homeschoolers and students are free to skip those questions as well as add any information the application neglects to ask that may be helpful to the admissions committee. They ask for either a traditional transcript, or in lieu of one, an outline of the curriculum, giving families the flexibility in complying with the requirements.

Still, despite the progress homeschoolers have made in educating the public about the benefits and successes of their methods, not all colleges and universities evaluate these students on a level playing field. Here are some examples:

Comments are closed.

Top Rated Comments   
The real question, Paula, is why should a home school parent care? As celebrities are people who are famous for being famous, elite schools are elite for being thought elite, at least outside the STEM arena and increasingly even there. My belief is that no Republican/conservative with the power to hire people in government or business should ever hire somebody from an Ivy or one of the other thought to be elite schools unless s/he knows the person and their family personally and is confident the person isn't some mind-numbed lefty robot. Government is the primary employer of the BA graduate with a non-specific degree at a level above entry; this is important.

Republican mayors and governors tend to be business people and we all know that business people aren't entitled to any intellectual respect by the people who decide who are the "intellectuals." They tend to compensate by surrounding themselves with staff with solid gold resumes. Unfortunately, government really can't afford people with solid gold resumes, so the resume really is just the credential they got from a college. Below the federal level, if you find anybody over 40 in the appointee ranks of a government, they are almost exclusively career 'crats who've taken the appointee position because they're subject matter experts; the rest are young people with little actual work experience but either the right parents, the right diploma, or both.

We control over half the state governments. A Republican AG should pointedly not hire lawyers from lefty schools, and if his/her state university is a lefty nest, he should make it clear that your law degree from even the state university won't help you. A Republican governor should make sure he has an actual Republican head of his/her personnel system, and a SHRM credential is almost a guarantee the candidate isn't a Republican. The first thing the head of the personnel system should do is review the minimum qualifications of every job classification in the system and eliminate the "a degree" qualification. The "a degree" qualification is the way the "Studies" majors get a ten year head start on somebody who actually can do the work. A HS diploma or GED will qualify you for the entry level in most government job classifications that don't require a special credential. You can work your way up to the top or very near the top of any class series just by doing the job and living long enough. But, the kid who comes out of college with a "Studies" or "Communication" degree can walk right in with no experience to a job that would take you ten years of actual work to get to. The degree requirement should have actual business utility for the job classification or the degree shouldn't give any preference over experience. There is hardly an organization in the Country who'd give somebody who'd been a successful manager in a real business a shot at a job when they could get some punk with an MBA. Frankly, I believe MBA's are the curse of the universe and I can't imagine the circumstance under which I'd hire one, at least not one right out of school.

And finally, since we do control half the states, we control at least the budgets and in some cases the management of half the state university systems. Were I governor I wouldn't presume to tell the "academic" who is head of my university system who he should hire or what she should teach, but I would tell him that I was going to make it clear that I wasn't going to hire any of the mind-numbed lefty robots s/he was producing. It wouldn't be hard to in a few years make sure that in a Red State the only job an elite school graduate could get would be getting a stipend from a union or some communist front to pose as an Occupier.
47 weeks ago
47 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (12)
All Comments   (12)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
What's the problem if they are? The elite colleges are overpriced basket cases meant for the "Networking" of the incompetent children of the incompetent elite. A lot of other private and states colleges provide fine educations the equal of the Ivy League only without the bran name, or cost. If the elite don't want those from outside the herd, that should be seen as a good thing.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
Homeschooled students skew the curve.
47 weeks ago
47 weeks ago Link To Comment
Paula,
As the Education Bubble collapses, Colleges and Universities can be expected to bias their admittance decisions to who can pay and stay with less bias toward diversity, etc, unless they're insane, which does seem rampant today amongst the elite.
On the stay part, the last statistic I saw indicated 50% of all college students drop out before graduation. The GPA, class standing, SAT or ACT scores, and extracurricular activities are meant to help separate and select those who have a higher probability of graduating. I wonder what the graduation rates for those Home Schooled are compared to public and private schooled kids? Additionally, while I totally support Home Schooling, typically college is the student's first long term away from home experience, and social pressure, without adult supervision, leads many young College kids to failure. School dependent, it's like taking a kid raised in a controlled environment without distractions and suddenly abandoning him or her to swim in a combination brothel and gin joint at the age when the hormones are raging. I wonder how parents Home Schooling their kids, prepare them to survive that experience?

47 weeks ago
47 weeks ago Link To Comment
In the study I linked above they found a much higher graduation rate among homeschoolers compared to public school students (66.7% compared to 58.6%) and a slightly higher freshman retention rate in addition to a higher GPA for homeschoolers.

This is just anecdotal, but of the several dozen homeschooled kids I've known who have attended college, I can only thing of one who really had trouble adjusting and none who got into any sort of trouble with the "gin joint" atmosphere you describe. Most homeschooled kids I know look at a lot of that behavior are really immature and stupid and don't see the point of it when there are plenty of other fun things to do that don't involve sex, drugs, and drinking. But that's just been my experience. I'm sure there are plenty of exceptions, but probably not any more so than among the public school population -- probably significantly less.
47 weeks ago
47 weeks ago Link To Comment
Ick...sorry for the typos!!
47 weeks ago
47 weeks ago Link To Comment
Frankly, the next logical step may be the homeschool equivalent of college/university.
47 weeks ago
47 weeks ago Link To Comment
There are books out there about how to set up your own study programs. I have one somewhere that I used some years back. I still ended up going to a regular college (community then a business degree program aimed at working adults) because I could afford it out of pocket and I got tired of family and others howling that I *HAD* to get a degree.
46 weeks ago
46 weeks ago Link To Comment
The real question, Paula, is why should a home school parent care? As celebrities are people who are famous for being famous, elite schools are elite for being thought elite, at least outside the STEM arena and increasingly even there. My belief is that no Republican/conservative with the power to hire people in government or business should ever hire somebody from an Ivy or one of the other thought to be elite schools unless s/he knows the person and their family personally and is confident the person isn't some mind-numbed lefty robot. Government is the primary employer of the BA graduate with a non-specific degree at a level above entry; this is important.

Republican mayors and governors tend to be business people and we all know that business people aren't entitled to any intellectual respect by the people who decide who are the "intellectuals." They tend to compensate by surrounding themselves with staff with solid gold resumes. Unfortunately, government really can't afford people with solid gold resumes, so the resume really is just the credential they got from a college. Below the federal level, if you find anybody over 40 in the appointee ranks of a government, they are almost exclusively career 'crats who've taken the appointee position because they're subject matter experts; the rest are young people with little actual work experience but either the right parents, the right diploma, or both.

We control over half the state governments. A Republican AG should pointedly not hire lawyers from lefty schools, and if his/her state university is a lefty nest, he should make it clear that your law degree from even the state university won't help you. A Republican governor should make sure he has an actual Republican head of his/her personnel system, and a SHRM credential is almost a guarantee the candidate isn't a Republican. The first thing the head of the personnel system should do is review the minimum qualifications of every job classification in the system and eliminate the "a degree" qualification. The "a degree" qualification is the way the "Studies" majors get a ten year head start on somebody who actually can do the work. A HS diploma or GED will qualify you for the entry level in most government job classifications that don't require a special credential. You can work your way up to the top or very near the top of any class series just by doing the job and living long enough. But, the kid who comes out of college with a "Studies" or "Communication" degree can walk right in with no experience to a job that would take you ten years of actual work to get to. The degree requirement should have actual business utility for the job classification or the degree shouldn't give any preference over experience. There is hardly an organization in the Country who'd give somebody who'd been a successful manager in a real business a shot at a job when they could get some punk with an MBA. Frankly, I believe MBA's are the curse of the universe and I can't imagine the circumstance under which I'd hire one, at least not one right out of school.

And finally, since we do control half the states, we control at least the budgets and in some cases the management of half the state university systems. Were I governor I wouldn't presume to tell the "academic" who is head of my university system who he should hire or what she should teach, but I would tell him that I was going to make it clear that I wasn't going to hire any of the mind-numbed lefty robots s/he was producing. It wouldn't be hard to in a few years make sure that in a Red State the only job an elite school graduate could get would be getting a stipend from a union or some communist front to pose as an Occupier.
47 weeks ago
47 weeks ago Link To Comment
I see where you're coming from but I disagree that the burdens are greater and honestly, what did you expect? They have to verify who they're hearing from. Parents are not objective judges of their children's skills, even if they are good teachers.

ANY kid attempting to get into a top tier school is going to submit subject SAT scores. My son will be submitting 3 separate ones and will probably end up in a state school. Home schoolers are also welcome to take AP exams as well and submit their scores for college credit. These are very helpful. My son will most likely be entering as a sophomore due to AP credits.
47 weeks ago
47 weeks ago Link To Comment
jmarie,

The problem is with schools require SAT subject tests from homeschooled students while not requiring them from any other students. Certainly, SAT IIs and APs are a great way to help pad your academic record, regardless of how you are educated, but stating up front that the're required of some students and not others is a problem.
47 weeks ago
47 weeks ago Link To Comment
Every elite school we have looked at requires them. Perhaps your definition of elite and mine are not the same? We have only looked at engineering requirements, though, so I don't know about other colleges within these 'elite' universities.

Regardless, I don't see it as a problem. It's a way for the school to judge the competence of a student. I would think home schooled students would want to take the SAT II to show their stuff. And the tests are relatively cheap and short. 3 tests in 3 hours.
47 weeks ago
47 weeks ago Link To Comment
I asked my son (who has home schooled friends, relatives and even competes against home schoolers at academic events) and he agreed that SAT II are not an undue burden. He said that colleges have information available about the quality of high schools their applicants come from, but not the home schools. Home schools are a wild card. He also said that the SAT II's are better tests to judge general subject knowledge, whereas SAT's judge standardized test taking ability.
47 weeks ago
47 weeks ago Link To Comment
View All