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New Robocop to Resume Original’s Satire

"We have your future under control."

by
Walter Hudson

Bio

July 26, 2013 - 7:15 am
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hi res robocop reboot 656

Hey, kids! Here comes another franchise reboot no one wanted. Robocop returns in 2014 taking new form played by The Killing’s Joel Kinnaman.

The new take looks to resume the original’s political satire by leveraging concern over domestic spying and the use of drone technology by law enforcement. In retrospect, the original film deserves a lot of credit for anticipating the modern convergence of military technology and domestic law enforcement. The Verge reports:

“We are more and more in a country where Robocop is relevant. You will see robots in wars,” said Jose Padilha, the film’s director. “The first film saw it way back then. Now we have more knowledge and we know it’s coming true. First we are going to use machines abroad, then we are going to use machines at home.”

Despite retaining many of the themes established in the 1987 film, the reboot will depart from the original on many key plot points. IGN shares the details:

In this RoboCop, police officer Alex Murphy (Kinnaman) isn’t killed by a ruthless outlaw and his henchmen, In fact, he’s not killed at all. He’s gravely injured by a car bomb that leaves him massively burned all over his body. In order to “save ” him — and give OmniCorp their cyborg lawman they’ve been desiring — Omni scientist Dr. Norton (Gary Oldman) essentially amputates Alex’s body from the neck down and rebuilds him as, yes, RoboCop. (They keep Alex’s right hand as a humanizing element for when RoboCop shakes hands with people.)

There were several scenes with OmniCorp CEO Raymond Sellars (Keaton), a believer in his products and what they can do for the world who makes his decisions not so much out of being a villain as because he’s decided it’s simply the best option available for his business and what he thinks it can provide. Keaton described Sellars as an antagonist rather than as a villain.

Readers may recall that Omni Consumer Products senior president Dick Jones, played with relish by the irrepressible Ronnie Cox, was the ultimate villain in the original. As he and director Paul Verhoeven also did in Total Recall, Cox created one of the greatest caricatures of corporate villainy put to film.

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All Comments   (8)
All Comments   (8)
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Hi. I have seen much of this film at this point, and have been connected with the production from the beginning. The film is sensational, and moreover, I am certain my conservative friends will like it very much.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
"I am certain my conservative friends will like it very much."

Because there's nothing conservatives (and libertarians) like so much as yet another in an unending liine of cliche movie plots painting the private sector as violent and corrupt. Maybe some day, if this reboot is successful, you can do a prequel depicting how government corruption, greed and stupidity made Detroit the way it was in the first place. Not only would that be highly different and fresh, but your conservative friends might get the highly unique viewing experience of seeing their views, for once, validated on the screen.
37 weeks ago
37 weeks ago Link To Comment
It's amazing to me that Hollywood continues to drink from the same stinking well. If SF is so damn popular, why not take the hint and adapt something like "The Demolished Man" or "The Stars My Destination?"

These people still haven't figured out that the reason "Star Wars" was so popular is that it gave the merest whiff of the nuanced and layered fun of SF literature. People got that whiff and ran with it. The promise has never materialized. They couldn't or wouldn't trust that promise and so butchered "John Carter" with predictable results.

I get dullard material like "Oblivion" and "Pacific Rim." Great. Wake up fools. An adaptation of "The Mote in God's Eye" would be an all-time smash hit. Just the trailer alone would leave people panting. And "Ender's Game?" Pfffft.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Who is capable of adapting Alfred Bester?
Who would be capable of directing such an adaptation?

I'd love to see either, but a studio would pick someone like that Kiwi idiot who has trashed Tolkien, and kill the incentive for people to ever read the books again.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
I'm still waiting for a genuine, faithful adaptation of Starship Troopers. And not just because I want to see the MI's powered armor brought to life.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
That would probably be a very cool movie. Character driven stuff with a bit of action with an SF background is one of the things the genre does very well. What would a remake of "Sands of Iwo Jima" set in the 25th century be like? For some reason when Hollywood writes SF they forget human frailty and the interest in simple story. It makes SF more real, not less.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
How about "West of Honor?" Can we get Pournelle to do a screenplay for the Secession Wars? Wouldn't you just love to see Sauron Supermen and Cyborgs fighting it out with Imperial Marines?

Come to that Weber and Ringo's Empire of Man series would make a great series of movies.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
That might be fun. It would certainly be better than what we've been seeing for years now on film. I might prefer to see the original short version of "Soldier Ask Not." On a less nuanced but very fun level, I'd love to see S.M. Stirling's "Drakon" adapted. That is a lovely bit of fun. We've seen a bit of it in film before, but it's very well done.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
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