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Ed Driscoll

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April 28th, 2013 - 4:35 pm

“Why Cary Grant is Mandatory for the Manosphere,” according to Aaron Clarey, the Blogosphere’s “Captain Capitalism:”

Cary Grant if you are unfamiliar with was arguably the premier actor from the golden years of Hollywood.  He played everything from his early years of romantic comedy fill-in to war hero in “Destination Tokyo.”  But if there was anything you could glean from Cary Grant at the age of 14 it was his vocabulary and charm.

Charm and vocabulary are things that are hard to teach.  They are endeavors that truthfully an individual must pursue and perfect.  But if you start enough at an early age, or dedicate yourself at an older age, you can naturally embed these traits into your being, infuse them into yourself, and in the end come out a much more advantaged man than your peers.  And this advantage is huge over your other alpha male contemporaries.

Understand that with all the TRUTHFUL and LEGITIMATE observations about confidence, dominance, leadership, etc. of the alpha male, not all of those traits are conveyed via physical posturing.  Women do not solely interact with you on a physical basis, matter of fact the majority of their INITIAL interaction with you will be verbal.  And therefore if you wish to improve your chances, having this “natural Cary Grantish charm” to bolster your “verbal game” will prove necessary.

How do you achieve this Cary Grantish charm?

Very simple.

1.  Watch Cary Grant movies.

2.  Plagiarize his lines.

3.  Increase your vocabulary.

Read the whole thing. In today’s world, where, as Dr. Helen writes, 25 is the new 15, the stars of Hollywood’s golden era seem more mature than ever, as Frederica Mathewes-Green wrote in 2005:

I’m a fan of old movies, the black-and-whites from the 1930s and 1940s, in part because of what they reveal about how American culture has changed. The adults in these films carry themselves differently. They don’t walk and speak the way we do. It’s often hard to figure out how old the characters are supposed to be—as though they were portraying a phase of the human life-cycle that we don’t have any more.Take the 1934 film Imitation of Life. Here Claudette Colbert portrays a young widow who builds a successful business. (Selling pancakes, actually. Well, it’s more believable if you see the whole movie.) She’s poised and elegant, with the lustrous voice and magnificent cheekbones that made her a star. But how old is she supposed to be? In terms of the story, she can’t be much more than thirty, but she moves like a queen. Today even people much older don’t have that kind of presence—and Colbert was thirty-one when the movie came out.

How about Clark Gable and Jean Harlow, smoldering away in Red Dust? They projected the kind of sexiness that used to be called “knowing,” a quality that suggested experienced confidence. When the film came out Gable was thirty-one and Harlow ten years younger. Or picture the leads of The Philadelphia Story. When it was released in 1940, Katharine Hepburn was thirty-three, Cary Grant thirty-six, and Jimmy Stewart thirty-two. Yet don’t they all look more grownup than actors do nowadays?

In contrast to all of the above, take a look at the poor schlub in the post that preceded Aaron Clarey’s homage to Cary Grant: the “Beta of the Century,” as Aaron notes, for whom 25 is definitely the new 15.

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All Comments   (8)
All Comments   (8)
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This is why TCM is the only thing I miss about tv. Hard work and civility was normal back then, so much so that even an "emotionally tortured bisexual" (or whatever polacko was snarking) could easily stroll onto the stage wearing a clean business suit and sharp fedora and display a politeness and class which shames any Hollywood A-lister today. And by the way, you cynical little snarky pants, it wasn't just Carey Grant. It was darn near everyone back then. People were'nt always genteel. They partied. But they at least knew how to shape up after the party was over.
50 weeks ago
50 weeks ago Link To Comment
cary grant was an emotionally-tortured gay man who allowed himself to be forced into the closet by the movie studio, sufferred through a series of studio-enforced marriages to women, became increasingly bitter and ended up dropping lots of acid hoping to 'find himself' and eradicate his pain. charming and debonair, on the surface, to be sure but is he really a role model ?
51 weeks ago
51 weeks ago Link To Comment
"Sorry if this disillusions you, but you shouldn't have any illusions about Hollywood."

Gee I had all kinds of illusions about Hollywood until reading your post. I always thought those to be ancient rumors, but I guess you have first hand knowledge that they are fact. Thanks for clearing this all up.
51 weeks ago
51 weeks ago Link To Comment
no need for 'rumors'...before the studio crackdown, cary grant and randolph scott's parties were all the rage in hollywood. in fact, it was the very popularity of their soirees that freaked the studio bigwigs out, fearing that some of their biggest stars true sexual orientations would be exposed. sad to say, not much has changed in hollywood since then.
51 weeks ago
51 weeks ago Link To Comment
Remember, Cary Grant wasn't Cary Grant without a lot of learning and practice, either. He started out as cockney Archie Leach.
51 weeks ago
51 weeks ago Link To Comment
Cary Grant once said, "Everybody wants to be Cary Grant, including me." In real life, he was small and petty like most actors. He hated Gary Cooper because he thought he got the roles that should have gone to him. One of his wives said Cary's idea of a good evening was going through his press clippings. He was bisexual; he and Randolph Scott had a thing going. Sorry if this disillusions you, but you shouldn't have any illusions about Hollywood.
51 weeks ago
51 weeks ago Link To Comment
Maybe that's why I cannot stand so many movies, these days. The male stars are usually petite and effete. (I cannot stand DiCaprio.) The starlets have no class, and they look like teenagers. (Think Cameron Diaz.) Almost none of them are self-possessed.
51 weeks ago
51 weeks ago Link To Comment
Exactly why I will probably give the new Star Trek movie a pass. Reset Kirk is a petulant teen, not a cool competent leader. There very few actors who can project confident maturity even occasionally. The females are so bad its impossible to remember their faces or names at all.
51 weeks ago
51 weeks ago Link To Comment
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