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Dr. Helen

No, I Still Don’t Buy into the Smith and Wesson Retirement Plan

February 24th, 2014 - 5:17 am

Aaron Clarey, author of Bachelor Pad Economics: The Financial Advice Bible for Men discusses the Smith and Wesson plan with Ed Driscoll. Here is what Aaron had to say:

MR. DRISCOLL: Aaron, I believe that both of your recent books rather infamously reference “the Smith and Wesson Retirement Plan.” Most of us would rather not, to quote Pete Townshend, “fire the pistol at the wrong end of the race.” While recommending much about Bachelor Pad Economics, in a post at PJ Media earlier this month, Dr. Helen Smith, who helped champion your books, took strong offense at your suggestion. Could you elaborate on your reasoning?

MR. CLAREY: Well, the reasoning is economic. And it is secular. I won’t deny that. So people who are religious or even traditional, they obviously would be against that. And I take no umbrage and no offense to it.

But from a purely economic point of view, and even a humanitarian point of view, there are some times where you’re terminally ill — pick your poison: cancer, a brain tumor, whatever. And you’re not coming back, you are going to die, and the remaining two weeks, three months, whatever your life, are going to be absolutely in pain and misery.

I think it’s wise or humane or ‑‑ what’s the word I’m looking for ‑‑ compassionate to, you know, somehow kill yourself, not necessarily with a Smith & Wesson, but some kind of euthanasia. And it not only puts you out of your misery, but it also saves a ton of money. I mean, I forget what the statistics are, but a plurality of your health expenses are incurred in the last six months of life.

So you want to talk about, you know, saving your family the grief of watching you just decay and, whatever, mentally, physically, what have you, or be in pain; not to mention save the finances for a future generation. It’s not for everybody. I’m not saying you have to do it, I’m just saying it is an option.

So it seems that Aaron is just advocating along with Obama that healthcare is expensive and it’s best to just die once you reach a certain age especially. Aaron advocates a gun or other means and Obama advocates a pill or pain killer, rather than investing in life saving treatments. I get that people suffer when they are older (and sometimes younger) but killing yourself for economic reasons is not a good solution in my book. My great aunt was 90 when she asked doctors to do bypass surgery. None would until she found a younger doctor who gave her the gift of four more years of a very good life. Her story is an inspiration to me.

And what about enjoying the decline? By using up government run healthcare as we age, wouldn’t we be doing our part?

*****

Cross-posted at PJ Lifestyle

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All Comments   (8)
All Comments   (8)
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An uncle had prostate cancer. He had beaten it once with radiation and chemo, but six years later it was back and stage 4. When he was down to the last couple months, when he was either having trouble thinking because of the pain meds or having trouble thinking because of the pain, he killed himself. I cannot fault him for this, honestly.

Let each decide when their term of life is up.
21 weeks ago
21 weeks ago Link To Comment
Your dear Aunt must have been fearsomely hardy! And I'm glad of that for all of you.

I must say, however, that after reading "Knocking at Heaven's Door" (which you may have seen excerpted in WSJ a while back) with its sobering picture of bypass surgery, I would have many hesitations about choosing it.
21 weeks ago
21 weeks ago Link To Comment
Until the lawyers got involved this was something that doctors and families took care of. When I was in surgery training, my professor told me that he put women with end stage g breast cancer on high does of steroids (cortisone) which made them feel better.

When they got so bad they had to go into the hospital, he "forgot" to order the steroids and they died quickly of adrenal insufficiency as a result of steroid suppression of their own adrenal glands.

The lawyers have put a stop to this. Good idea ?
21 weeks ago
21 weeks ago Link To Comment
The examples he gave are terminal illnesses associated with a very poor quality of life during the last few month. I'd suicide under those circumstance. I'd also do so when Alzheimer's or similar incurable diseases cause too much loss of mental function. My mother lived for six years unable to recognize a single person, not even her daily caretakers. The personality areas of her brain were destroyed, so she was a memory-less zombie. Death before dementia.
21 weeks ago
21 weeks ago Link To Comment
There's no "one size fits all" answer to this, and it's an issue that you DON'T want handled by a bureaucrat.

I have a close friend with a brain tumor. We've discussed several aspects of this, what his wishes are, and what he needs me to do, and what he doesn't think his family has the strength to do. On the odd chance that he outlasts me, we've had a reciprocal discussion.

Making a grisly mess for someone else to deal with doesn't sound like the intent of Cleary's comment. I think he just meant to be blunt, and hopes those that consider it have the decency to make more considerate decisions.
21 weeks ago
21 weeks ago Link To Comment
I just spent the last several months taking care of my aunt as she died of cancer. Two of my grandparents also died of cancer. The last week or so of that was utter hell. If I am unlucky enough to get in that condition I'll down the rest of my pills with a bottle of Jack to just get it over with.
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
My grandmother had terminal colon cancer. She moved in with us so her daughter (my mom, an RN) could take care of her. Years later I found out that the doctors had basically told them how to end her life if it got unbearable -- probably along the lines of "don't take X number of these pills, that would cause cardiac arrest." She died in her sleep, at home. This was 1974. As this was a house built in 1774, it has seen lots of births and deaths. No suicides as far as I know though.
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
Obviously, this isn't a black and white area. But check back after you've watched someone suffer a slow, painful death. As in marriage, sometimes it'll work out, other times it just creates and prolongs suffering. The decision to remove yourself shouldn't be one based on age, etc. It should be based on a rational assessment of suffering.

And no, I don't care about how those who will remain feel, care or worry. At the end, the person facing death should make their choice based solely on what is best for them. It is the most important time to be selfish and self serving.
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
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