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WikiLeaks: Assange's Internet Link Severed by 'State Party'

WikiLeaks tweeted early Monday morning that Julian Assange’s Internet link was severed by a “state party” and that “appropriate contingency plans” had been activated.

The Australian founder of WikiLeaks has been living in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London for over four years and has been granted political asylum by Ecuador.

The WikiLeaks announcement came about nine hours after Assange posted three cryptic tweets referencing Ecuador, Secretary of State John Kerry, and the United Kingdom’s Foreign & Commonwealth Office.

Via Fox News:

Gizmodo noted that the 64-character codes sparked a whirlwind of rumors that the 45-year-old Assange had died. Rumors on Reddit and Twitter said the numbers triggered a so-called “dead man’s switch,” which could be enacted in case Assange did die. Gizmodo reported that such switches do exist.

WikiLeaks hasn’t tweeted anything else about Assange’s Internet access or how it may have been “severed.”

Various U.S. officials and pundits have made threatening statements directed at Assange in the past. WikiLeaks tweeted in early October an alleged 2010 quote from then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton asking if Assange could be killed in a drone strike, and, that same year, former Democrat strategist Bob Beckel said on Fox News Channel that "a dead man can't leak stuff." This month, "specific information" prompted Assange to scrap a dramatic London balcony address to celebrate WikiLeaks' 10th anniversary.

Assange also has hinted that deceased DNC staffer Seth Rich may have been a secret source for WikiLeaks. Rich, 27, was discovered with multiple gunshot wounds to the back at a Washington, D.C., intersection in July. He died soon thereafter. Authorities believe Rich was the target of a botched robbery; however, odd circumstances surrounding his death have invited conspiracy theories.

The controversial anti-secrecy website has been busy in October, methodically releasing a trove of emails allegedly stolen from the gmail account of Clinton presidential campaign chair John Podesta. WikiLeaks had released just more than 12,000 emails of a purported 50,000 they have access to as of Monday morning. The Podesta emails have raised questions about a too-cozy working relationship between the Clinton campaign and some members of the media and has also shed light on how Clinton's team handled various scandals.

It wasn't immediately clear if the Podesta revelations were the "October surprise" Assange hinted his group would release in advance of the U.S. election.

There have been rumors that WikiLeaks is saving its most damaging information for last. To that end, conservative news aggregator Matt Drudge recently suggested that Hillary Clinton is about to get hit with a major sex scandal of her own: