Feminist Learns She's Attracted to Men She Despises

Feminism spends a lot of time telling men how they're supposed to act. Of course, they do the same to women, too.

For an ideology that supposedly exists simply to argue that the two sexes are equal, feminism sure is preoccupied with telling everyone what decisions they should make -- and what kind of taste they should have, too.

For example, it's not enough to make sure women can work. Feminism goes further, looking down on women who decide to be housewives. And it has patience whatsoever for women who happen to be attracted to men with dominant personalities.

Uh oh. This feminist just learned she likes men she's supposed to hate. And felt so confused about it, she wrote an op-ed for the Washington Post:

Within minutes of meeting my Bumble date at a bike race, he demanded that I take off my sunglasses so he could see my eyes. I obliged. In the two hours we were together, he proceeded to put his hand firmly on my butt, pretending to usher me through a crowd. He also did not ask before reaching over to rub my shoulders, as though he had a right to touch my body.

As a feminist writer, I understand that these behaviors denote male entitlement and indicate that he might not respect women. And yet, I was turned on. I have always been attracted to dominant men.

I have intermittently been dating online for over two years, and I have dated all kinds of men: those in white-collar jobs and blue-collar ones; white men; dark men; young men; older men; tall men; short men; men who lie about their relationship status. But what hasn’t wavered, is that, as a “traditionally feminine” woman, I end up being attracted to the men who come off as “traditionally masculine.”

The writer of this piece, Shannon Lell, goes on to quickly soothe ruffled feminist feathers. Her article virtue-signals about "mansplaining" and other feminist dog whistles.