The PJ Tatler

The UN's Child-Molestation Problem

As if the useless entity known as the “United Nations” — you know, the one in that big building in Turtle Bay, occupying all that prime Manhattan real estate while providing safe haven for lawbreaking “diplomats” and spies from all over the world? — weren’t bad enough, let’s remember how the Blue Helmets make new friends as they “keep in the peace” in funny foreign countries:

The boys said they approached the French soldiers because they were hungry. Some were so young they didn’t quite understand the acts the soldiers demanded in return. One boy, 8 or 9 years old, said he did it several times to the same soldier, “until one day an older kid saw him and told him what he was doing was bad.” Another boy, 9, said he thought the soldiers had been urinating.

U.N. investigators heard such stories of sexual abuse from several boys in May and June 2014 in Central African Republic, where French soldiers were protecting a sprawling displaced persons camp in the conflict-torn capital, Bangui. One year later, revelations about how the U.N. handled the boys’ accounts have horrified people both inside and outside the world body. Statements marked “strictly confidential” have shown that its top human rights officials failed to follow up for several months on the allegations their own office had collected.

On Saturday, the high commissioner for human rights, Zeid Raad al-Hussein, said his office was sending a team to Central African Republic to look into what the statement called “possible further measures to address human rights violations,” including sexual violence. The office also will ask “concerned states” what they have done to investigate them and prosecute anyone. No arrests have been announced, and it’s not clear where the accused soldiers, who were supporting a U.N. peacekeeping force, are now. The U.N. seems unable to say when the abuses stopped, or how long it continued to investigate.

That’s the UN for you — unaccountable, and doesn’t care who knows it. Also a nice touch having a “high commissioner” for human rights named al-Hussein.

The boys’ accounts are simple and stark. An 11-year-old said he had gone “looking for empty wrappings to play with” when a French soldier first called him over, later giving the boy food and a little money in exchange for oral sex. Another boy, 9, “had been severely beaten by his mother when he told her what had happened.”

The case has exposed a glaring weakness in a world body that considers human rights one of its three main pillars: It has no specific guidelines on how to handle allegations of child sexual abuse, and no requirement for immediate, mandatory reporting.

And yet this monstrosity, a First World goo-goo idea that has long since been co-opted and destroyed by corrupt Third World “countries,” continues to enjoy high public esteem, proving once against that for “liberals,” it’s the thought that counts. But the deeds speak for themselves.