Round the Blind Curve

That long drawn out "nooooo!" encapsulates the left's total rejection of Donald Trump's presidency, both in it's legitimacy and aims.

Yet the sound and fury of the anti-Trump riots hide the fact that the street theater is fundamentally a defensive tactic, designed to keep a demoralized base together rather than attract new adherents. The riots are not intended to appeal to the undecideds, rather they are aimed at holding together what progressives still have. The Guardian solemnly concludes that the inauguration of Donald Trump is nothing less than a declaration of war on the progressive project and all that it signifies.

But wars do not begin without a plan.  Shouting "nooo!", burning cars and smashing windows are not strategy but what stands for the lack of one.  Where any such will come from is the question.  The progressives have no clear successor leadership following their spectacular collapse. All it has are the wrecks of political dynasties which perform no other function than obstruct a reboot of the progressive cause.

Hopes that Barack Obama will lead the resistance make about as much sense as relying on Ed Milband to lead the recovery of the British Labor party he destroyed. Obama would represent the continuation of failure. Yet the alternatives to Obama are thin on the ground, unless one counts the Clintons, Gores and Pelosis who like so many twisted girders left over from a structural collapse, will linger as hazards to political navigation until time and rust remove them from the weedy bottoms.

The more fundamental unsolved problem is why the progressive project collapsed in the first place.  How could something at the seeming height of its power; in control of the EU, the US Federal government, the UN, the press, the academe and industry collapse in one fatal year?  The globalist conference in Davos still doesn't know.  In that ignorance lurks a peril far greater than DJT.

In past years, this annual gathering of leaders, CEOs and bankers in the Swiss Alps has had a glum undertone to it because of the succession of crises, mainly of a financial nature, rocking the globe.

But this year there was a sense that something far bigger is going on, a shifting of the tectonic plates of global politics that is breeding deep uncertainty and may herald a return to a rougher, tougher world defined by national self interest.

The conventional wisdom is that Trump has "destabilized" the system.  But Trump did not cause Brexit, nor did he cause the American unrest, even though he rode its wave to power.  What blaming Trump ignores, both in Europe and in Washington, is that much of the instability must have come from the collapse of the progressive project itself.  The elites having created a Walmart economy were somehow faced by a revolt of Walmart greeters of which DJT is just one effect.