News & Politics

College Hiring Director to Promote 'Feminist Theories and Knowledge'

Women chant and raise their signs during a rally, part of International Women's Strike NYC, a coalition of dozens of grassroots groups and labor organizations, Wednesday, March 8, 2017, at Washington Square Park in New York. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

The University of Scranton in Pennsylvania is seeking to hire a new director to promote “feminist theories and knowledge” and “social justice theories” on campus, according to a job listing on Chronicle Vitae.

The new “Director of Cross Cultural Centers” will be tasked with managing the school’s Women’s Center, which is funded by the school’s $42,910 annual tuition. The director will be asked to “implement programs and initiatives on gender equity and social justice that incorporate feminist theories and best practices,” which include “identity development, social justice, and women’s leadership.”

Because social justice is intrinsic to the center’s mission, the director will also work alongside professors to “increase students’ understanding of feminist theories and knowledge” so that students are motivated to engage in “social justice action.”

These theories include ones such as “rape culture,” which posits that rape is so pervasive at colleges that one in five women will be victims of sexual assault, and “masculinity,” a feminist theory about how men are conditioned to adhere to “toxic” social roles.

The University of Scranton did not respond to a request for comment from PJ Media on whether students are required to undergo any feminist or social justice educational programming during their time as students.

The new director’s focus on feminist theories is consistent with the Women’s Center’s overarching goal, which is to provide a “safe and comfortable gathering place” for female students to discuss issues related to feminism and gender inequality.

In addition to promoting feminist theories, the director will also be asked to “advocate for marginalized student populations” while on the job and to provide workshops about “healthy relationships,” according to the job listing.

While feminist theory revolves around the notion that women are oppressed in society, it seems that they are alright at the University of Scranton, where women comprise almost 60% of the student body.

This gender imbalance is not unique to Scranton. Across America, women increasingly outnumber men on college campuses. Women graduate at higher rates, too. Considering this, perhaps the University of Scranton might benefit from a Men’s Center.

Schools such as the City University of New York (CUNY) and the University of Oregon do have gender-specific centers where male students can find support. But unfortunately, Scranton argues that this is not needed. Their website notes:

While we understand that men face discrimination, rarely are they discriminated against because of their sex/gender. Establishing a men’s center would suggest that the historical and current status of men is similar to that of women, which it is not.

Further, they also state that a Men’s Center would be simply unnecessary, since they claim that their Women’s Center serves “as a resource for all genders.” This bizarre claim is belied by the fact that the Women’s Center offers absolutely no programming for men.

The successful new candidate to lead the center “will understand feminist theories, critical race theory, multicultural competence, social change theory, and gender equity and will be able to plan, implement, and assess programs focused on gender topics,” and will have a minimum of three years of experience, according to the job description.

The school is also recruiting students to become presenters with the school’s PACT program, which teaches incoming freshmen about affirmative consent and sexual misconduct. (Many other colleges have implemented similar programs for freshmen.)

The University of Scranton is one of many institutions of higher education where student tuition helps fund this feminist-industrial complex. Other schools are hiring for new positions over the summer, too: For example, the University of Wisconsin is seeking a “Social Justice Education Specialist”; Lewis University wants to hire someone to coordinate “social justice pilgrimages”; and Northwestern University hopes its new Fraternity Director will promote “social justice” among new pledges.

The University of Scranton did not respond to multiple requests for comment from PJ Media on the job listing.

Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @Toni_Airaksinen