News & Politics

New York City CEOs Warn Mayor de Blasio of 'Widespread Anxiety' Over City's Future

AP Photo/John Minchillo

The evidence that New York City is falling into the pit is right in front of your face — if you choose to look. But Mayor Bill de Blasio is too busy showing New Yorkers the true path to enlightenment and can’t be bothered with mundane things like the violent crime rate, garbage collection, and the homeless haranguing citizens while defecating on their front porches.

So more than 160 corporate CEOs in the city have written a letter to the mayor, pleading with him to act decisively to save the city.

New York Post:

“There is widespread anxiety over public safety, cleanliness and other quality of life issues that are contributing to deteriorating conditions in commercial districts and neighborhoods across the five boroughs,” the powerful business leaders wrote to de Blasio Thursday.

“We need to send a strong, consistent message that our employees, customers, clients and visitors will be coming back to a safe and healthy work environment. People will be slow to return unless their concerns about security and the livability of our communities are addressed quickly and with respect and fairness for our city’s diverse populations,” they wrote.

De Blasio successfully purloined $1 billion from the police budget and another $100 million from the Department of Sanitation. The shortfall has not gone unnoticed in New York’s neighborhoods. With most businesses still shuttered, so many unemployed, and people living in fear of violent crime, a sense of hopelessness hangs like a pall over much of the city.

But de Blasio remains wedded to his woke agenda and won’t be deflected by calls to change direction.

Guardian Angels founder Curtis Sliwa, who’s also a Republican candidate for mayor, said “these guys and gals in the suites” are addressing what people in the streets face every day.

“To expect major corporate figures to encourage their workforce to return when the quality of life has fallen so measurably, it’s a wake up call to the mayor.

“It’s time for the mayor basically to wake up and get this city back on track,” Sliwa told The Post.

Democrats are starting to get nervous and are calling on de Blasio to heed the warnings of the CEOs.

Civil rights attorney Maya Wiley, a Democratic candidate for mayor who used to work for de Blasio, commended the Partnership for “taking up the call on basic services that’s already come up from Harlem, Hunts Point and other communities on the frontline of impact and recovery.

“This is an unprecedented crisis that requires all hands on deck from bankers to barber shop owners, everyone has a contribution to make,” Wiley told The Post.

Meanwhile, de Blasio thanked the CEOs for their input and blamed the crisis on Washington.

“We’re grateful for the business community’s input, and we’ll continue partnering with them to rebuild a fairer, better city.

How about a “safer, cleaner city”?

“Let’s be clear: We want to restore these services and save jobs, and the most direct way to do that is with long term borrowing and a federal stimulus. We ask these leaders to join in this fight because the stakes couldn’t be higher,” Neidhardt said.

No, Bill. The “most direct way” to address the problems in the city is to restore cuts to the police and sanitation departments and announce a zero-tolerance policy for riots and street violence. You’d be amazed what you can do when you stand up for the law.

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