News & Politics

Federal Court Upholds Texas 'Heartbeat Bill'

AP Photo/Steve Helber

The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has decided to uphold the Texas “heartbeat bill,” which will remain in effect until it is most likely challenged in the Supreme Court.

The panel of three judges voted 2-1 to keep Texas law SB8, the “heartbeat bill,” with Appellate Judges Catharina Haynes and James Ho voting in favor of the law, and Judge Carl Stewart dissenting.

The Department of Justice will likely take its request to stop the law to the Supreme Court.

Of course, this has not stopped the left-wing, mainstream media from reporting sob stories about women having to leave Texas to stop the heartbeats of their unborn children.

The Guardian reports a story of a 33-year-old woman from Texas who drove to Louisiana.

“If you can’t get rid of the baby, what’s the next thing you’re going to do? You’re going to try to get rid of it yourself. So I’m thinking: ‘What could I do? What are some home remedies that I could do to get rid of this baby, to have a miscarriage, to abort it?’ And it shouldn’t be like that. I shouldn’t have to do that. I shouldn’t have to think like that, feel like that, none of that… Its not right,” she stated, according to The Guardian.

That statement alone sums up everything that is wrong with the pro-choice movement. She seems to understand it’s a baby and even calls it as much, and yet she still asks how she can “get rid of the baby.” Imagine how that would sound if the baby were outside of the womb. A life is a life regardless of location.

Then she considers “home remedies.” A self-administered abortion at home is as much a “home remedy” as cutting off your head to cure a headache.

In another case, Jasmine, a 26-year-old woman, laments her pregnancy.

“I’m not even in my 30s yet. I’m not ready for that,” she said, according to Vice. “I’m not ready to bring another life into this world that I can’t support.”

“I shouldn’t have to go and plan this elaborate trip, spend double the money for my own health. It’s not fair,” she continues, “it’s more angered me than anything else, because I feel like my voice needs to be heard. Other women’s voices need to be heard. And we’re getting shot down. There is no sense of security for women in Texas at this point.”

Her voice and the voices of other women need to be heard? How about the voices of girls who are unborn? They have no voice. Who will speak for them?

Interestingly enough, in both stories, the women ask the hard questions after the fact. Men and women should be asking these types of questions before pregnancy, not after. The question should not be, “Now that we’re pregnant, what should we do?” It should be, “What if we get pregnant?”

Its old old-fashioned, but it’s old for a reason, the best way to avoid these situations is to abstain from the activity that causes them until both people are ready. And marriage is the best way to ensure that both the mother and father are in it for the long run. For now, Texas is on the right path.