Michael Totten

Bomb Shelters

Amichai Geva and Yehuda Beinin, the two peace activists I interviewed earlier, gave me a tour of one of the community bomb shelters at Kibbutz Shomrat, just north of Akko (Acre) near the border with Lebanon.
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The entrance leading underground is in a communal area behind several old houses. The door was unlocked and open just in case the war started again and the sirens went off.
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The stairs lead deep underground, deep enough that I felt psychologically secure down there as well as physically secure.
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The place is purely functional, though. It is not where you want to live for a month.
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This shelter is used by 20 people. There are a couple of smaller rooms that branch off from the main room pictured above.
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But I only saw one single bed.
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Here is a picture of Amichai’s bomb shelter. His house is new, and all new houses are required by law to include sealed rooms (to protect against chemical weapons) that can also absorb a direct hit by a rocket or missile. The walls are solid, thick, and lined with books. Amichai told me he rather enjoys staying in his above-ground shelter. It’s just another room in his house. With books, a computer, music, a bed, and a window, what more do you need?