Anal Cancer: The New Gay Epidemic the Media Won't Talk About

Cropped shot of mature male couple with arms around each other at coast

The Los Angeles Times calls anal cancer "the next big crisis" for the gay community. According to the American Cancer Society, the future looks grim.

The American Cancer Society estimates there will be 8,200 new anal cancer cases in 2017. In the absence of national screening recommendations, more than 50 percent of these individuals will be diagnosed at stage III or IV, when five-year survival is less than 40 percent. This creates a major public health concern.

The study shows that anal cancer comes from the sexually transmitted virus HPV. What it doesn't mention is why the gay community is so susceptible to contracting HPV. Perhaps the answer is too politically incorrect for the L.A. Times. NBC reported on a similar study that was done in Hawaii involving women who contracted anal HPV. They danced around the cause in an almost laughable way.

It’s not clear exactly how the women contracted anal HPV. Those who developed infections were more likely to be young and white, with lower levels of education and income and a history of multiple sexual partners, the study showed. Women who engaged in anal sex were also at higher risk, though transmission could have occurred in other, non-sexual, ways...The findings are important because anal HPV infection is strongly linked with anal cancer...

Really? Non-sexual ways? What ways are those? The article does not elaborate but goes out of its way to deny the very findings discovered!

The Hawaii study showed a greater risk of HPV infection in women who recently had anal sex, though the association wasn't as high as researchers expected. Non-penetrative sex and use of fingers and sex toys also may have contributed to transmission of HPV, or the virus could have been shed from cervical secretions, the report said. It is also possible that responses to our questions regarding anal sex were less than candid,” the authors wrote. Study participants were twice as likely to contract the high-risk strains of the HPV virus associated with cervical and other cancers than the low-risk variations of the virus, the report showed.