Sarah Silverman Asks Military to Overthrow 'Fascist' Trump

Sarah Silverman (and presumably other liberals) has apparently acquired a sudden love and respect for America's military.

The same crowd that branded them "baby killers," that accused just about every soldier of being a potential mass murderer, that spent the last 50 years mocking our warriors, belittling them, calling them "occupiers," protesting against them, all while while trying to shut down recruiting offices and ROTC programs on campus -- this same crowd now thinks that soldiers can be our saviors in the age of Trump.

Talentless celebrity Sarah Silverman gave voice to these newfound feelings of loving our soldiers by calling on the military to overthrow Donald Trump to save us from "fascism.

(The tweet has since become "unavailable.")

This tweet received 6505 "likes." Sheesh.

Breitbart:

Silverman’s tweet linked to another tweet which listed several actions President Trump had taken on Wednesday.

An early supporter of Senator Bernie Sanders’ presidential run, Silverman shifted her support to Hillary Clinton and trashed then-Republican nominee Trump every step of the way.

After Clinton’s historic defeat, the 46-year-old comedienne compared Trump winning the White House to the Great Depression.

“For a lot of people, this is the Great Depression, but this time it’s emotional & physical,” Silverman wrote on Twitter. “Our bodies r breaking down w fear & rage…”

Silverman advocating for the military to overthrow the government after Trump’s election is a departure from her more peaceful attempts in the past, where she urged Trump to “listen to the outcries” of those who oppose his presidency.

The Emmy-winner’s calls for the military to overthrow Trump came amid violent rioters burning buildings UC Berkely campus, in protest of  Breitbart Senior editor Milo Yiannopoulos.

Hollywood director and producer Judd Apatow said the UC Berkeley riots were “just the beginning.” Apatow has since walked back those comments.

Silverman is delusional and, her Seven Days in May scenario notwithstanding, there is zero chance that the generals would even contemplate a coup, much less large units of troops obey their orders. It simply is not in the DNA of the American military to seek to rise above the civilian authorities. More than 230 years of tradition -- and the solemn oath taken by all individual soldiers when they enlist -- preclude the kind of unconstitutional action Silverman and many liberals are calling for.

The closest we've ever come to a military coup was in 1783, when George Washington scotched the Newburgh Conspiracy, in which dozens of officers in the Continental Army planned to march on Congress in Philadelphia to demand the fulfillment of promises made to them when they volunteered. Washington assembled the plotters and, in a memorable address delivered in Newburgh, New York, cemented his place in history as the Father of our Country by appealing to the emotions of the officers who had shared with him seven long years of war and privation.

He then produced a letter from a member of Congress to read to the officers. He gazed upon it and fumbled with it without speaking. He then took a pair of reading glasses from his pocket, which were new; few of the men had seen him wear them. He then said: "Gentlemen, you will permit me to put on my spectacles, for I have not only grown gray but almost blind in the service of my country." [28] This caused the men to realize that Washington had sacrificed a great deal for the Revolution, just as much as any of them. These, of course, were his fellow officers, most having worked closely with him for several years. Many of those present were moved to tears, [29] and with this act, the conspiracy collapsed as he read the letter.

The American solider today doesn't need a George Washington to tell him where his duty lies. And he certainly doesn't need Sarah Silverman to urge him to violate his oath and conscience to overcome a non-existent threat.