Get Fit or Die

via Pudgy Stockton (via)

Do we work out for health or beauty? Yes.

I'm in the middle of reading Making the American Body: The Remarkable Saga of the Men and Women Whose Feats, Feuds, and Passions Shaped Fitness History by Jonathan Black. (Full review to come.)

So far, it's enormously entertaining and enlightening, and I'm recommending it to friends already. Interestingly, it focuses more on the clash of personalities (and marketing styles) than on the fitness methods themselves. But what stood out to me is how so many marketing campaigns for fitness regimes, dating all the way back to the nineteenth century, played on fear and shame. Apparently every era of American society has teetered on a crisis of emasculation and/or unhealthiness. And that crisis also happens to necessitate buying lots of new equipment, accessories, and specialty food, so we can fit into the clothes that exalt the body type that the fitness trend tells us we must have.

Another thing that stood out to me was the changing shape of the "ideal" woman. One of my favorite stories from the book so far (and a welcome note of positive, encouraging marketing) was that of Pudgy Stockton. Pudgy's nickname originated in her chunky teen years, but she shed the pounds and gained a very different reputation on Santa Monica's Muscle Beach. A smiling, playful fitness icon, Pudgy is credited with demonstrating to women of her generation that females can lift weights without losing their femininity -- and that lifting can even enhance their womanly curves. It was refreshing to see a female fitness icon who didn't look like she could fit through the eye of a needle -- but was still healthy, attractive, and feminine.