Australian Brewery Drops Bible Society Beer After Gay Marriage Backlash

The breakdown of debate surrounding LGBT issues is a global phenomenon. Coopers Brewery in Australia cancelled the release of a limited-edition light beer commemorating the 200th anniversary of the Bible Society, after a "light-hearted" video debate about gay marriage caused outrage. Yes, activists object even to the idea of debate, it seems.

"On behalf of the Coopers board and senior staff, we are incredibly saddened by the impact our involvement with the Bible Society has had on our valued Coopers drinkers and our extended family," the brewery's managing director, Tim Cooper, said in a statement. He added that "our company's guiding principles have centered around respect for others, and as such the recent activity surrounding the video made by the Bible Society has conflicted with our core values."

"Our company supports marriage equality," declared Melanie Cooper, director of corporate affairs. "We've consequently cancelled the release of our Bible Society commemorative cans, and will be taking steps to show our further support for our community, including joining Marriage Equality Australia."

This utter surrender to pressure from the LGBT movement did not even make sense. "The recent activity surrounding the video made by the Bible Society has conflicted with our core values" — what does that even mean? It sounds like Tim Cooper is trying to say the Bible Society video disrespected gay people, without actually saying it.

But the video included nothing inherently offensive — unless the idea of a "light-hearted" conversation about the "heavy issue" of gay marriage is itself insulting. The video featured Liberal Member of Parliament Tim Wilson and his fellow Liberal MP Andrew Hastie having a conversation about gay marriage, drinking Coopers light beer, for a "Keeping it Light" ad. Wilson argued for gay marriage, while Hastie argued against it.

"Relationships should be recognised as marriage if they're long-term and committed, because they provide the foundations of a society going from individual to forming family, building community and ultimately country," Wilson argued. "That's how we make a strong country and whether people are heterosexual or homosexual, we should want people committed to that."

He claimed that "marriage equality" was necessary to be inclusive about marriage, featuring "two people regardless of their gender."

Hastie, on the other hand, argued for "retaining the current definition of marriage, which is between a man and a woman." He added that "it's equal, and it's diverse, it's got both genders." Perhaps more importantly, "it's an institution that's grown up organically prior to politics. My view is the state shouldn't be redefining something that exists prior to the state."