Hillary Clinton Destroys Computer in New Cruz 'Office Space' Ad

The newest ad put out by Texas Senator Ted Cruz takes a page out of the movie Office Space to slam the secrecy of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. It melds together two iconic parts of the 1990s business comedy -- the song "Damn it feels good to be a gangsta," and the scene where three main characters destroy a printer with a baseball bat and their bare hands.

In the iconic film, these are moments of catharsis, where an office-bound nine-to-five worker decides to challenge the system. In the Ted Cruz ad, this is a moment of corruption, where an established politician deliberately breaks the rules to perpetuate her hold on power.

The entire ad, released by MSNBC's Morning Joe on Twitter Friday, consists of one scene, where a woman playing Hillary Clinton teams up with two suited men to destroy a desktop computer. Rap lyrics about Clinton's shady misuse of government power play in the background, as Clinton -- in her famous pantsuit -- and her goons go to town on the tech.

Damn it feels good to be a Clinton/A shameless politician always plays her cards right/got a crew for the fight on the airwaves/lapdogs in the press keep their mouths tight.

The ad insinuates that while Clinton hides her shady deals, the press keeps mum to protect her from the American people. It also insinuates that the former secretary of State used a private email server in order to hide information from the American people -- not as "a matter of convenience" as she claims. The ad makes these subtle policy attacks in hilarious rap lyrics:

'Cuz a Clinton never needs to explain what, why it is what they done or with who. A real Clinton knows that they're entitled, and you don't get to know what they do.

Using dubstep, the song draws out Clinton's famous question, "What difference does it make?"

"Wha-what difference does it make?" for a Clinton, what's loaded in some fat Apple file. A Clinton plays the victim for promotion, a Clinton kills it off with a smile.

This is merely the latest in a list of strong Cruz ads combining popular culture and political issues.