Ed Driscoll

The Return Of The Son Of The Ultra-Flexible WMD Definition

Ann Althouse writes:

Let’s look at the news of these arrests over the weekend:

Nine members of the Christian militia group Hutaree have been indicted on multiple charges involving an alleged plot to attack police, including seditious conspiracy and attempted use of weapons of mass destruction, the U.S. Attorney in Michigan announced this morning.

“Six Michigan residents, along with two residents of Ohio and a resident of Indiana, were indicted by a federal grand jury in Detroit on charges of seditious conspiracy, attempted use of weapons of mass destruction, teaching the use of explosive materials, and possessing a firearm during a crime of violence,” according to the government’s press release, which you can read in full below.

From the government’s own press release:

The indictment further alleges that the Hutaree planned to kill an unidentified member of local law enforcement and then attack the law enforcement officers who gather in Michigan for the funeral. According to the plan, the Hutaree would attack law enforcement vehicles during the funeral procession with Improvised Explosive Devices with Explosively Formed Projectiles, which, according to the indictment, constitute weapons of mass destruction.

Assuming these allegations are true, this is indeed a nefarious plan and it’s great that these people were caught. But I must also say that it’s interesting to see that Improvised Explosive Devices with Explosively Formed Projectiles, which, according to the indictment are “weapons of mass destruction.” That blows a big hole in the notion that there weren’t weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.

To be fair, this isn’t the first story with a Michigan-related angle to involve WMDs and their ever-changing definition.