Ed Driscoll

Wellstone Redux

Michelle Malkin looks at the politicized funeral for Coretta Scott King (complete with video); Lorie Byrd and The Anchoress have some further thoughts.

Interesting take from Glenn Reynolds:

Why does this keep happening? Part of it, I think, is that the Democratic Party is in a state where it finds it hard to get national TV coverage except when someone dies. I think that their behavior reflects another forlorn hope for regeneration. I guess looking at policies is out of the question, though.

Update: Ian Schwartz links to my original post on the Wellstone funeral from three and a half years ago–8,000 or so posts later, to be honest, I completely forgot that I had blogged it.

Another Update: While the article that this post links to isn’t about the King funeral, it seems very much related, at least to me.

One More: Glenn Reynolds updates his post with a link to Jay Redding, who asks, “Can we have some dignity, please?” and responds:

Apparently not. And this post by Eric Muller only serves to underline the very point it attempts to refute. The problem with today’s Democrats is that they try to invest the naked hunger for power with the dignity of the civil rights movement, a dignity that they no longer possess because it was based on a self-discipline that they no longer possess.

Emphasis mine–because I think that’s a spot-on observation. Instead, as Jay Redding wrote:

The Democrats are learning from the worst of the Republican Party during the Clinton Administration. One would think given that they were on the other side that they would do better. Then again the sad state of American politics makes me think that the idea of being able to put partisanship aside for one gorram moment is just too much to ask of some people these days.

Coretta Scott King was the wife of one of the greatest leaders of this century, a man who transformed American society for the better. She herself was a great and dignified woman. She deserved a better send-off than that.

Exactly.