Culture

You Won't Believe Who's Trashing Michael Moore's Broadway Show

Josh Lucas checks most of the boxes when it comes to the modern liberal actor. He says so himself.

The star of “Poseidon” and “American Psycho” understandably couldn’t wait to see Michael Moore’s new Broadway show, “The Terms of My Surrender.”

It’s what you expect from Moore. An all-out attack on President Donald Trump.

Lucas’ reaction, by comparison, comes as a complete shock. And he’s not alone. Some surprising sources are railing against “The Terms of My Surrender.” And it’s not coming from conservative media, which has mostly ignored the play’s content so far.

Mainstream media outlets (read: liberal media) are hitting the show hard.

Let’s start with Lucas’ comments, captured by the New York Daily News. At a time when Americans should be rallying together, Moore is keeping us apart, the actor said.

“I believe in everything he’s saying, I believe in everything about his message,” Lucas told us. “The way he’s presenting it right now on Broadway — (it’s) everything that’s wrong with politics entirely. Total divisionist crap. It’s us against them. To me, it’s dead wrong.”

He had much more to say.

“Honestly, on the record, say as a performer on Broadway, that is a bogus ill-prepared show,” he said. “I agree with all of his politics. I completely disagree with this show.” So two thumbs down?

So, one harsh review from a like-minded soul? Hardly.

The New York Times (yes, that New York Times) called it “Bragging on Broadway.”

Still, you don’t have to disagree with Mr. Moore’s politics to find that his shtick has become disagreeable with age. “The Terms of My Surrender,” which opened on Thursday at the Belasco, is a bit like being stuck at Thanksgiving dinner with a garrulous, self-regarding, time-sucking uncle. Gotta love him — but maybe let’s turn on the television.

The Guardian notes that Moore’s show won’t be a “Mission Accomplished’ moment for the far-left fellow.

If Moore hopes to convert the unconverted, is a Broadway stage really the best place to do it?

Later, the outlet says Moore’s rah-rah efforts counter his goals.

The assumption that the audience at the Belasco theatre consisted only of Democrats – which might very well have been the case – ran contrary to Moore’s posturing as the populist prophet.

The Washington Post chimed in, saying Moore should leave Broadway “to the pros.”

Less a jaunty excursion than an unvarnished ego trip, ­the show is a slog through cringe-
inducing skits and only occasionally engaging anecdotes about Moore’s stumble into the life of a political gadfly.

Ouch.

Some outlets loved Moore’s show all the same. Yet the near-universal admiration for the Cuba-loving filmmaker is all but gone.

Maybe news that this “Everyman” who rails against capitalism once owned nine homes is coming back to haunt him. Or perhaps liberal media outlets can’t cover up for his serially flawed arguments anymore.